Naomi Elmore1

d. circa 1792
     Naomi Elmore was born at Farmington, Hartford Co., CT.2 She was the daughter of Daniel Elmore and Mary Norton. Naomi Elmore married Daniel Humphrey, son of Ensign Samuel Humphrey and Mary Orton.1 Naomi Elmore died circa 1792.1

Children of Naomi Elmore and Daniel Humphrey

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 296.
  2. [S503] Jill Carpenter, "Jill Carpenter," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 5 March 2004.
  3. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 384.

Luman Humphrey1

b. 22 June 1782, d. 30 January 1841
     Luman Humphrey was born on 22 June 1782 at Goshen, Litchfield Co., CT.1 He was the son of Daniel Humphrey and Naomi Elmore.1 Luman Humphrey married Philena Dryer, daughter of Samuel Dryer and Philena Robbins, on 23 February 1815 at Junius, NY.1 Luman Humphrey died on 30 January 1841 at Millgrove, IN, at age 58.1

Child of Luman Humphrey and Philena Dryer

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 384.
  2. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 525.

Philena Dryer1

b. 25 April 1793, d. 10 September 1860
     Philena Dryer was born on 25 April 1793 at West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., MA.1 She was the daughter of Samuel Dryer and Philena Robbins.1 Philena Dryer married Luman Humphrey, son of Daniel Humphrey and Naomi Elmore, on 23 February 1815 at Junius, NY.1 Philena Dryer died on 10 September 1860 at Millgrove, IN, at age 67.1

Child of Philena Dryer and Luman Humphrey

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 384.
  2. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 525.

Otis Milton Humphrey MD1

b. 26 April 1832
     Otis Milton Humphrey MD was born on 26 April 1832 at Victor, Ontario Co., NY.1 He was the son of Luman Humphrey and Philena Dryer.1 Otis Milton Humphrey MD married Sarah Frances Dennis, daughter of Richard Dennis and Lucy Ann Hooper, on 28 August 1862 at Lowell, MA.1

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 525.

Sarah Frances Dennis1

b. 8 February 1840
     Sarah Frances Dennis was born on 8 February 1840 at Lowell, MA.1 She was the daughter of Richard Dennis and Lucy Ann Hooper. Sarah Frances Dennis married Otis Milton Humphrey MD, son of Luman Humphrey and Philena Dryer, on 28 August 1862 at Lowell, MA.1

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 525.

David Homer Clary1

b. 6 October 1855, d. 18 May 1882
     David Homer Clary was born on 6 October 1855 at Monroeville, OH.1 He was the son of Homer Caswell Clary and Laura Humphrey.1 David Homer Clary died on 18 May 1882 at Monroeville, OH, at age 26.1

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 466.

First Lady Laura Lane Welch

b. 4 November 1946
First Lady Laura Welch Bush
     First Lady Laura Lane Welch was born on 4 November 1946 at Midland, Midland Co., TX. She was the daughter of Harold Bruce Welch and Jenna Louise Hawkins.1 First Lady Laura Lane Welch married President George Walker Bush, son of President George Herbert Walker Bush and First Lady Barbara Pierce, on 5 November 1977 at First United Memorial Church, Midland, TX.2

Army Gen. Tommy Franks, the commander of the U.S. forces in Afghanistan in 2001, went to the same high school in Midland from which Laura Bush had graduated.


Children of First Lady Laura Lane Welch and President George Walker Bush

Citations

  1. [S182] Social Security Death Index (on-line), Ancestry.com, SSDI, Ancestry.com, SSAN 454-01-1500.
  2. [S549] Wargs: George Walker Bush, online http://www.wargs.com/political/bush.html

Barbara Pierce Bush

b. 25 November 1981
     Barbara Pierce Bush was born on 25 November 1981 at Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX. She was the daughter of President George Walker Bush and First Lady Laura Lane Welch.

Jenna Welch Bush

b. 25 November 1981
President George W. Bush and Jenna Bush pose for a photographer Saturday, May 10, 2008, prior to Jenna's wedding to Henry Hager at Prairie Chapel Ranch in Crawford, Texas. White House photo by Shealah Craighead
     Jenna Welch Bush was born on 25 November 1981 at Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX. She was the daughter of President George Walker Bush and First Lady Laura Lane Welch.

Timothy Bush Jr.

     Timothy Bush Jr. married Lydia Newcomb, daughter of Daniel Newcomb and Elizabeth May.

Child of Timothy Bush Jr. and Lydia Newcomb

Lydia Newcomb

     Lydia Newcomb was the daughter of Daniel Newcomb and Elizabeth May. Lydia Newcomb married Timothy Bush Jr.

Child of Lydia Newcomb and Timothy Bush Jr.

Daniel Newcomb

     Daniel Newcomb married Elizabeth May, daughter of Hezekiah May and Anna Stillman.

Child of Daniel Newcomb and Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May

b. 3 December 1730, d. shortly after 1789
     Elizabeth May married Daniel Newcomb. Elizabeth May was born on 3 December 1730 at very probably Wethersfield, CT.1 She was the daughter of Hezekiah May and Anna Stillman.1 Elizabeth May died shortly after 1789.1

Child of Elizabeth May and Daniel Newcomb

Citations

  1. [S549] Wargs: George Walker Bush, online http://www.wargs.com/political/bush.html

John Lyman Bohac1

Citations

  1. [S290] Bebe Hayes Garcia, "Bebe Hayes," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 11 Dec 2000.

Ralph Garcia1,2

b. 25 September 1933, d. 13 March 1996
     Ralph Garcia was born on 25 September 1933 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA.1,2 He died on 13 March 1996 at Riverside, Riverside Co, CA, at age 62.1,2

Citations

  1. [S290] Bebe Hayes Garcia, "Bebe Hayes," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 11 Dec 2000.
  2. [S182] Social Security Death Index (on-line), Ancestry.com, SSDI, Ancestry.com.

Alfred William Phelps1,2

b. 12 July 1818, d. 9 August 1896
     Alfred William Phelps was born on 12 July 1818 at Hebron, Tolland Co., CT.1 He was the son of Erastus Phelps and Polly Yeomans. Alfred William Phelps died on 9 August 1896 at New Haven, New Haven Co., CT, at age 78.1

Alfred William Phelps died at his residence in New Haven, August 9th 1896. He was born in Hebron, Connecticut, July 12, 1818. His father was Erastus Phelps, a Revolutionary soldier. Two uncles of Mr. Phelps, brothers of his father, also served in the war of the Revolution. Mr. Phelps removed to New Haven in 1837, and then learned the trade of carpenter. He was one of the founders and for many years president of the Mechanics' Lyceum in New Haven. In 1841 he became a member of Harmony Lodge, No. 5, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of that city. He passed the chairs and entered the Grand Lodge and became grand master of Connecticut in 1871, and was grand representative to the Grand Lodge of the United States in 1872 and 1873. He became a member of Sassacus Encampment, I.O.O.F, in 1852, and later became a member of the Grand Encampment. He represented New Haven in the state Legislature in 1867 and 1868. In 1843 he married Mary A., daughter of Reuben Bunell and sister of the late H. H. Bunnell, of New Haven, and had seven children, two of whom are living.

Mr. Phelps was an enthusiastic member of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, to which he was admitted April 23, 1889, and of General David Humphreys branch of that society. His memory was wonderful. He could entertain a gathering by the hour with recitations of poetry and prose, many of which were on temperance, of which he was an ardent advocate. Mr. Phelps was present at the annual meeting in May last of General David Humphreys Branch, and those who were present will never forget his entertaining recitations and reminiscences of Revolutionary times told him by his father, in many of which he participated. In honor of his being a true son of a Revolutionary patriot, the board of managers, at their meeting held in July last at Hartford, voted him a life member without payment of dues.3

Citations

  1. [S294] Publications Committee, SAR CT 1895-96, Page 584.
  2. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 703.
  3. [S294] Publications Committee, SAR CT 1895-96.

Erastus Phelps1,2

b. 15 January 1763
     Erastus Phelps was born on 15 January 1763. He was the son of Amos Phelps and Anna Filer.3,4

Child of Erastus Phelps and Polly Yeomans

Citations

  1. [S294] Publications Committee, SAR CT 1895-96, Page 584.
  2. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 398, # 1564..
  3. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 229, # 521.
  4. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 229.

Child Phelps

b. between 1642 and 1644, d. 1647
     Child Phelps was born between 1642 and 1644. Child Phelps was the child of George Phelps and Phillury Randall. Child Phelps died in 1647.

William Augustus Muhlenberg Wainwright

b. 10 August 1844, d. 23 September 1894
     William Augustus Muhlenberg Wainwright was born on 10 August 1844 at New York City, NY.1 He was the son of Bishop Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright and Amelia Maria Phelps. William Augustus Muhlenberg Wainwright died on 23 September 1894 at Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, at age 50.1

William Augustus Muhlenberg Wainwright died at his home in Hartford, September 23, 1894. He was born in New York city August 10, 1844, and had attained his fiftieth year. He was the youngest of the fourteen children of Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright, Episcopal bishop of the diocese of New York, whose wife as Amelia Maria Phelps, a daughter of Timothy Phelps, of New Haven, and granddaughter of Judge John Phelps, of Stafford. Bishop Wainwright was ordained a priest in Christ Church, Hartford. Dr. Wainwright was named for Rev. William Augustus Muhlenberg, the philanthropist, who founded St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in New York city. He was prepared for college in New York and entered Trinity College in 1860, and was graduated in 1864, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. After his graduation he returned to New York and studied medicine under Drs. Henry B. Sands and Alexander Hosack and was also a student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, from which he was graduated in December, 1866. He at once entered the New York Hospital, although for a short time in 1865, he was attendant at the Hartford Hospital. In the earlier part of 1867, he was given his diploma and then served for two years in the New York Hospital. He went to Hartford in the spring of 1870 and began practice there, where he afterwards resided.

In 1872, he was chosen an attending physician and surgeon at the Hartford Hospital and has been intimately connected with that institution since, of more recent years as a visiting surgeon. Four years ago he was elected a member of the board of medical visitors of the retreat for the insane. For ten years he was assistant surgeon of the 1st company, Governor's Foot Guard. He was medical supervisor of the State Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company of New Jersey, the United States Life Association of New York and the Union Mutual Company of Maine. He was a member of the American Medical Association, and the State Medical Society, and on the occasion of the one hundredth anniversary of the Hartford County Medical Society he was its president. He is the author of many papers on medical and surgical subjects, and at the centennial celebration of the Connecticut Medical society read a paper on "Medico-legal aspects of Chloroform" which caused considerable discussion, and was regarded as a particularly able treatise of the subject. Dr. Wainwright was a member of St. John's Lodge, A. F. and A. M.

In church work Dr. Wainwright was particularly active. He was a communicant of St. John's Church for thirty years, and had been a vestryman for a score of years or more. In 1893 he was chosen president of the Church Club of Connecticut, and in 1889 and again in 1890 was a delegate to the general convention of the church. He had been a trustee of Trinity College since 1887.

On January 14, 1869, Dr. Wainwright was married to Helena Barker Talcott, daughter of Thomas Grosvenor Talcott, for many years a well known resident of Hartford. Eleven children were born to them, but only four survive-two sons and two daughters-Mabel Wyllys, Jonathan Mayhew (who is a student at Trinity College and paymaster of the 1st regiment C. N. G., with the rank of Lieutenant), Elizabeth and Philip.

As a physician and surgeon Dr. Wainwright stood at the head of his profession. He was a man of splendid physical development and notable masculine beauty.

Dr. Wainwright's position among Hartford people was firmly established and diversified. He was a leader in many interests, and socially he was a representative of our best culture. Able, active, well-educated, of courtly manners and popular with his friends, he brought to his profession, to his church work and the various organizations with which he was connected, social, military and philanthropic-sound learning, good judgment, superior executive ability, love of progress and true liberality of opinion.

Dr. Wainwright was always a "good citizen" of Hartford-interested in its development, ever willing to aid in public improvements, a cheerful giver to every worthy object, a helper with his pen and personal work, as well as with his purse.

On the Sunday following the funeral of Dr. Wainwright, the Rev. James W. Brudin, rector of St. John's Church, paid the following tribute to his memory. Taking for his text, "Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun," he said:

"As I have thought of the friend who went from us since last we met here, of his life, his pathetic, yet calm and heroic trust and courage, I have thought also of his life and the lessons he teaches us. I do not forget the depths of his manly tenderness that shone forth in life and death, nor the unfailing consideration for others. These are all known and lovingly dwelt upon. None who ever came in contact with that life will ever forget them.

"But of the highest sense of honor, both in professional and home and social life, of the scorn of shams, of the appreciation of what was good and true, of righteous living, who can speak as he would like to speak? As on a rock he stood, with his eye set and heart set on what was right, manly and noble, and when he came to die, it was his strength, modest and yet self-reliant, honorable and yet merciful in his nature, strong and yet tender, brave and yet pitiful, his was a character that we will treasure ling in our loving memory.

"That scene, last Thursday, when he was carried away from the church he loved and for which he willingly labored, and whit that marked success that attended all his work, will be log remembered. On the first Sunday of this month he knelt here for his last communion. Writing to a relative a few lays after, he said: 'You, last Sunday, were in --- worshipping in your own church, and I was in dear old St. John's, enjoying a service in the same old and well known way in which we wee brought up.' That church, filled with men and women of all classes and conditions, from the highest to the lowliest, told of how his character and life had so nobly discharged its missions. As one stood and saw how that large number of men and women poured forth and took each a silent glance of his face, how his life had reached and helped so many; never any parade, rather a shy hiding of his feelings and his benefactions to others. None ever began to know how much he had done in his faithful service unto others, until it was known he was gone. To-day, as a people, whether in this parish or in this community, we are poorer for the loss of this noble and faithful life, as we are richer when we tell and hear of his deeds and dwell in loving thought on his character.

"Many things will linger long among us of the strong life just gone; many tributes to his memory, told from all conditions of society by those who knew and were helped by him. The two things which will stand out as clearly, if not more so than others, will be the unfolding record of his quiet life of goodness, and then the high and noble way in which he lifted the ideal of his profession. In the first, how many have told of deeds and scenes which showed how quietly and so beautifully he carried out the spirit of his Master of doing good to others. Tender, considerate, thoughtful, how like a truly brave man he stood at his post of duty. Then who, more than he, showed the dignity, worth and power of his profession?

"A Christian doctor has within his reach such usefulness for doing good as has no other man in a community. How well he used them --- with consummate skill, with keen penetration into causes and forms of disease, with the tenderness of a woman, and deep sympathy of a strong man, with a consideration for the sufferer and for his family which took in all things, how he made his calling seem nobler and raised it to the highest uses.

"Then when human skill and care had been exhausted and the life must go, how reverently he took out his prayer-book, which seemed to be always with him, and said the last prayer by the bed of the dying. When one knows these things, how St. Paul's words come to us as he wrote his own friends, 'Like the beloved physician, whose praise is in the gospels.'

"I could say more, for the last hours, so sacred to those who were privileged to see them, would only fill the soul with deeper thoughts of his strong and brave life and death, but over them must be drawn the veil of silence. But as I stand here to-day to give in these imperfect words, some tribute to his memory, I think what an example he sets for all men to stand firm and true, to be tender and merciful, to be full of loving service unto others, but above all to be true, to walk in the ways of righteousness, for that will bring a man peace at the last.

"When sounds and lights of earth are fading and the soul catches those of that distant but longed-for land, may we meet it as he and others met it, who suffered and were tried, and were faithful to the last.

"No nobler guerdon can come to the true warrior, the faithful servant, the man of righteousness, the child of God, than the fulfillment of the dear Lord's own words of promise. 'Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father.'"

Dr. Wainwright was admitted to our society February 18, 1891, as great-grandson of John Phelps of Stafford, twice appointed on a committee to furnish arms and ammunition during the Revolution, and who also from his foundry cast cannon and balls.

In Dr. Wainwright ran some of the best blood of American ancestry. He was a descendant of Thomas Mayhew, a resident of Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1636, and governor of Martha's Vineyard; of the Rev. Experience Mayhew, his son, the noted missionary to the Indians; and of the later's son, the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew, pastor of the West Church in Boston, who, with James Otis and Oxenbridge Thacher, struck the sparks which kindled the fires of the Revolution. He was the great-grandfather of Dr. Wainwright. John Adams said of him: "He is a Whig of the first magnitude, a clergyman unequaled by few of any denomination for piety, virtue, genius or learning; whose work will maintain his character as long as New England shall be free; integrity esteemed, wit, spirit, humor, reason and knowledge admired." Robert Treat Paine said of him, "he was the father of civil and religious liberty in Massachusetts and America." It was Dr. Mayhew who, in a letter dated June 8, 1766, suggested to James Otis the importance and efficacy of committees of correspondence between the colonies. One month later---July 8, 1766---he died, as says his tombstone, "overplied by public energies." His age was 45.

Dr. Wainwright was a member of the board of managers of this society from the annual meeting after his election until his death.2

Citations

  1. [S294] Publications Committee, SAR CT 1895-96, Page 592.
  2. [S294] Publications Committee, SAR CT 1895-96.

Amelia Maria Phelps1

b. 24 June 1797
     Amelia Maria Phelps was born on 24 June 1797 at New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. She was the daughter of Timothy Phelps and Janet Broome.2,3

Child of Amelia Maria Phelps and Bishop Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright

Citations

  1. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 304, # 2429.
  2. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 304, # 990.
  3. [S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, Page 304.

Daniel Charles Clary1

b. 9 January 1858
     Daniel Charles Clary was born on 9 January 1858 at Monroeville, OH.1 He was the son of Homer Caswell Clary and Laura Humphrey.1

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 466.

Edward Decius Clary1

b. 18 July 1862
     Edward Decius Clary was born on 18 July 1862 at Monroeville, OH.1 He was the son of Homer Caswell Clary and Laura Humphrey.1

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 466.

Frank Alfred Clary1

b. 4 April 1865
     Frank Alfred Clary was born on 4 April 1865 at Monroeville, OH.1 He was the son of Homer Caswell Clary and Laura Humphrey.1

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 466.

Charles Stone1

b. 10 February 1825
     Charles Stone was born on 10 February 1825 at Shrewsbury, MA.1 He was the son of Calvin R. Stone and Susan Fitch. Charles Stone married Mary Humphrey, daughter of Colonel Decius Humphrey and Laura Adams, on 25 March 1856 at Muscatine, Muscatine Co., IA.1

Children of Charles Stone and Mary Humphrey

Citations

  1. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 466.
  2. [S275] Frederick Humphreys, Humphreys, Page 467.