Elizabeth Mary Davis1

b. 1 January 1904
     Elizabeth Mary Davis was born on 1 January 1904 at Denison, TX.1 She was the daughter of Olen Davis and Anna Josephine McCarthy.1 Elizabeth Mary Davis married Karr William Ellingwood, son of Edward Wellington Ellingwood and Mabel Dolly Karr, on 9 October 1924 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA.1

Citations

  1. [S587] D. A. York, "Ira Matoon Ellingwood," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 22 July 2004.

Olen Davis1

     Olen Davis married Anna Josephine McCarthy.

Child of Olen Davis and Anna Josephine McCarthy

Citations

  1. [S587] D. A. York, "Ira Matoon Ellingwood," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 22 July 2004.

Anna Josephine McCarthy1

     Anna Josephine McCarthy married Olen Davis.

Child of Anna Josephine McCarthy and Olen Davis

Citations

  1. [S587] D. A. York, "Ira Matoon Ellingwood," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 22 July 2004.

Noel Lafayette Whitman1

     Noel Lafayette Whitman married Laura Elizabeth Lewis.

Citations

  1. [S587] D. A. York, "Ira Matoon Ellingwood," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 22 July 2004.

Laura Elizabeth Lewis1

     Laura Elizabeth Lewis married Noel Lafayette Whitman.

Citations

  1. [S587] D. A. York, "Ira Matoon Ellingwood," e-mail to James H. Holcombe, 22 July 2004.

James Lester Aldrich

     James Lester Aldrich married Harriet Clark.

Child of James Lester Aldrich and Harriet Clark

Harriet Clark

     Harriet Clark married James Lester Aldrich.

Child of Harriet Clark and James Lester Aldrich

Charles Rawson

b. June 1867
     Charles Rawson was born in June 1867 at OH.1 He married Grace Holcombe, daughter of Andrew Holcombe and Anna E. Aldrich, circa 1890.1

Children of Charles Rawson and Grace Holcombe

Citations

  1. [S35] 1900 Federal Census, unknown repository address.

Samuel Eggleston

b. 9 December 1747
     Samuel Eggleston was born on 9 December 1747 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. He was the son of Nathaniel Eggleston and Abigail Goodwin. Samuel Eggleston married Dorcas Loomis, daughter of Stephen Loomis Jr. and Grace Loomis, on 9 August 1770 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT.

Child of Samuel Eggleston and Dorcas Loomis

Dorcas Loomis

b. 8 August 1752
     Dorcas Loomis was born on 8 August 1752. She was the daughter of Stephen Loomis Jr. and Grace Loomis. Dorcas Loomis married Samuel Eggleston, son of Nathaniel Eggleston and Abigail Goodwin, on 9 August 1770 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT.

Child of Dorcas Loomis and Samuel Eggleston

Nathaniel Eggleston

b. 8 January 1701/2, d. 11 January 1796
     Nathaniel Eggleston was born on 8 January 1701/2 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. He married Abigail Goodwin on 14 March 1737/38. Nathaniel Eggleston died on 11 January 1796 at age 94.

Child of Nathaniel Eggleston and Abigail Goodwin

Abigail Goodwin

     Abigail Goodwin married Nathaniel Eggleston on 14 March 1737/38.

Child of Abigail Goodwin and Nathaniel Eggleston

Elizabeth Demond1

b. circa July 1700
     Elizabeth Demond was born circa July 1700; illegitimate.1 She was the daughter of Mary Case.1

Citations

  1. [S590] George E. McCracken, "Two Mary Cases."

Kezia (?)1

     Kezia (?) was born; illegitimate.1 She was the daughter of Daniel Eames and Mary Case.1 Kezia (?) was baptized on 1 March 1695/96 at Hartford First Church, Hartford, Hartford Co., CT.1

Living in 1751, when mentioned in her mother's will with a daughter Lucy then old enough to have nursed Kezia through an illness. What surname Kezia bore, whether Eames, Case or Phelps, is unknown, and nothing is known of her subsequent history nor that of her daughter Lucy. 1

Citations

  1. [S590] George E. McCracken, "Two Mary Cases."

Daniel Eames1

Child of Daniel Eames and Mary Case

Citations

  1. [S590] George E. McCracken, "Two Mary Cases."

Elizabeth Sandford1

     Elizabeth Sandford married Goodman Joseph Collier.

Child of Elizabeth Sandford and Goodman Joseph Collier

Citations

  1. [S590] George E. McCracken, "Two Mary Cases."

Andrew C. Rawson1

b. August 1891
     Andrew C. Rawson was born in August 1891 at OH.1 He was the son of Charles Rawson and Grace Holcombe.1

Citations

  1. [S35] 1900 Federal Census, unknown repository address.

Lura G. Rawson1

b. August 1893
     Lura G. Rawson was born in August 1893 at OH.1 She was the daughter of Charles Rawson and Grace Holcombe.1 Lura G. Rawson married Paul E. Sage. Lura G. Rawson was buried at Lagrange Cemetery, Lagrange Twp., Lorain Co., OH.

Citations

  1. [S35] 1900 Federal Census, unknown repository address.

Helen Phillips

b. 1 December 1924, d. 25 January 2006
     Helen Phillips was born on 1 December 1924 at Platteville, Grant Co., WI. She was the daughter of Earl Leroy Phillips and Margarite Beatrice Hupperts. Helen Phillips died on 25 January 2006 at age 81.

from the Desert Sun, 13 February 2006:

Helen Phillips Holcomb, 81, of Desert Hot Springs died Jan. 25, 2006, in Palm Springs.
She was born Dec. 1, 1924, to Earl Leroy Phillips and Margarite Beatrice Hupperts Phillips in Platville, Wis.
She married John Leonard Holcomb on Feb. 27, 1983, in Upland.
She was a bank manager for 60 years, including at First Trust Bank in Desert Hot Springs.
She was a member of the Soroptimists, Alltimers of the Orange Empire, St. Anthony Episcopal Church and Desert Crest Country Club.
She is survived by her husband, John Holcomb of Desert Hot Springs; her daughter, Linda Price of Blackwell, Okla; her son, Clifford Schnack of Wrightwood; two stepdaughters, Deborah Leitner of Enid, Okla. and Adrienne Seastrom of Louisburg, Kan; two stepsons, Russell Holcomb of Palm Springs and Rodney Holcomb of Post Falls, Idaho; a sister, Marion Cavette of Milwaukee, Wis; 11 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Monday at St. Anthony Episcopal Church in Desert Hot Springs.
Inurnment will be at St. Anthony Episcopal Church with Rose Mortuary of Desert Hot Springs in charge of arrangements.
The family suggests that donations be made to the Lupus Foundation.

Earl Leroy Phillips

     Earl Leroy Phillips married Margarite Beatrice Hupperts.

Child of Earl Leroy Phillips and Margarite Beatrice Hupperts

Margarite Beatrice Hupperts

     Margarite Beatrice Hupperts married Earl Leroy Phillips.

Child of Margarite Beatrice Hupperts and Earl Leroy Phillips

Benjamin Loomis1

b. 8 December 1779, d. 22 March 1847
     Benjamin Loomis was born on 8 December 1779 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT.1 He was the son of Benjamin Loomis and Chloe Brown.1 Benjamin Loomis married Mary Gaylord, daughter of John Gaylord and Mary Webster, on 21 February 1805.1 Benjamin Loomis died on 22 March 1847 at Bloomfield, Hartford Co., CT, at age 67.1

Children of Benjamin Loomis and Mary Gaylord

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.
  2. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Frances C. Pearson1

b. circa 1854
     Frances C. Pearson was born circa 1854 at CT.1 She was the daughter of Charles H. Pearson and Emily Catherine Clemmons.1

Citations

  1. [S362] 1880 Federal Census, unknown repository address.

William Lawrence Barnard

b. 6 December 1875, d. 28 May 1956
     William Lawrence Barnard was born on 6 December 1875 at Andover, Essex Co., MA. He was the son of Edwin Lawrence Barnard and Helen Clemons Pearson. William Lawrence Barnard died on 28 May 1956 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 80.

Melville Clemens Barnard

b. 6 December 1875, d. 19 August 1965
     Melville Clemens Barnard was born on 6 December 1875 at Andover, Essex Co., MA. He was the son of Edwin Lawrence Barnard and Helen Clemons Pearson. Melville Clemens Barnard died on 19 August 1965 at Kern Co., CA, at age 89.

Melville C., and Hallie S. were enumerated in the 1900 Winthrop, Suffolk Co., MA, federal census. He was a bookkeeper, age 24, she was 22. The were boarding in the household of Charles H. Perkins.

Mary Gaylord1

b. 4 November 1780, d. 4 October 1861
     Mary Gaylord was born on 4 November 1780.2 She was the daughter of John Gaylord and Mary Webster.1 Mary Gaylord married Benjamin Loomis, son of Benjamin Loomis and Chloe Brown, on 21 February 1805.1 Mary Gaylord died on 4 October 1861 at age 80.1

Children of Mary Gaylord and Benjamin Loomis

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.
  2. [S591] Loomis-Gaylord Bible.
  3. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

John Gaylord1

     John Gaylord married Mary Webster.

Child of John Gaylord and Mary Webster

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.

Mary Webster1

     Mary Webster married John Gaylord.

Child of Mary Webster and John Gaylord

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.

Mary Loomis1

b. 24 November 1806, d. 27 May 1874
     Mary Loomis was born on 24 November 1806 at CT.1 She was the daughter of Benjamin Loomis and Mary Gaylord.1 Mary Loomis married George Tuttle, son of Caleb Atwater Tuttle and Sally Reed, on 8 January 1832.1 Mary Loomis died on 27 May 1874 at Blue Hills, Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, at age 67.1

George and Mary were enumerated in the 1850 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer age 43, she was 43. Children in the household were Mary A. 17, Albert G. 16, William H. 9, Charles 7, and Lucius 4.

George and Mary were enumerated in the 1860 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer age 53, she was 53. Children in the household were Mary A. 26, William H. 19, Charles L. 17, and Lucius 14.Mary Loomis, age 79 was also in the household.

George and Mary were enumerated in the 1870 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer age 62, she was 63. The only child in the household was Mary A. 37.

George was enumerated in the 1880 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer, age 72. The only child in the household was Mary, 47.

Children of Mary Loomis and George Tuttle

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.
  2. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

George Tuttle1

b. 17 July 1807
     George Tuttle was born on 17 July 1807.1 He was the son of Caleb Atwater Tuttle and Sally Reed.1 George Tuttle married Mary Loomis, daughter of Benjamin Loomis and Mary Gaylord, on 8 January 1832.1

Children of George Tuttle and Mary Loomis

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.
  2. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Caleb Atwater Tuttle1

     Caleb Atwater Tuttle married Sally Reed.

Children of Caleb Atwater Tuttle and Sally Reed

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.
  2. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Sally Reed1

     Sally Reed married Caleb Atwater Tuttle.

Children of Sally Reed and Caleb Atwater Tuttle

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 309.
  2. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Mary A. Tuttle1

b. circa 1833
     Mary A. Tuttle was born circa 1833 at CT.1 She was the daughter of George Tuttle and Mary Loomis.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Albert George Tuttle1

b. circa 1833
     Albert George Tuttle was born circa 1833 at CT.1 He was the son of George Tuttle and Mary Loomis.1

Albert and Elizabeth were enumerated in the 1870 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was 36, she was 38. Children in the household were William 6 and Bertha L. 1.

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Willaim Henry Tuttle1

b. circa 1840
     Willaim Henry Tuttle was born circa 1840 at CT.1 He was the son of George Tuttle and Mary Loomis.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Charles Loomis Tuttle1

b. circa 1842
     Charles Loomis Tuttle was born circa 1842 at CT.1 He was the son of George Tuttle and Mary Loomis.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Lucius Tuttle1

b. 11 March 1846, d. 30 November 1914
     Lucius Tuttle was born on 11 March 1846 at Hartford, Hartford Co., CT.1 He was the son of George Tuttle and Mary Loomis.1 Lucius Tuttle died on 30 November 1914 at Brookline, MA, at age 68.

Lucius was married, probably in 1868 to Henrietta b. abt 1850 , MA, based on information in the 1870 census. Two of his daughters, Jennie and Etta were clearly born before the marriage to Estelle. In the 1910 census it is reported that Lucius had been married twice.

Lucius and Henrietta were enumerated in the 1870 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was 24, she was 20. The only child in the household was Edith 1.

Lucius and Estella were enumerated in the 1880 Somerville, Middlesex Co., MA, federal census. He was 33, she was 32. Children in the household were Jennie 9, Etta M. 7, and Effie E. 2.

Lucius and Estella were enumerated in the 1900 Boston, Suffolk Co., MA, federal census. He was 54, she was 53. They had been married 24 years and the census indicated that Estelle had three children, two still living. The only child in the household ws Effie E. 21 (Jan. 1879).

Lucius and Estella were enumerated in the 1910 Brookline, Norfolk Co., MA, federal census. He was 63, she was 62. They had been married 36 years; it was Ludius' second marriage. The only child in the household was Effie Foster, 32, a widow.


From the Biographical History of Massachusetts, Samuel Atkins Eliot, Editor in Chief, Massachusetts Biographical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, 1911:
Lucius Tuttle, president of the Boston & Mane Railroad and of the Maine Central Railroad company, is a thorough-going New Englander by birth and lineage. He was born in one of the most characteristic of New England cities, Hartford, Connecticut on March 11, 1846, the son of George Tuttle and Mary (Loomis) Tuttle. His father was a descendant from William Tuttle, who came from St. Albans, England to Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635, landing from the ship Planter in the town of Boston and removing, in company with his wife Elizabeth, to New Haven Colony in 1638. The Tuttle family is of old English origin, and the name was variously written Tothill or Totehill, signifying Lookout Hill, an eminence or high place of observation. Mr. Tuttle’s mother was descended from Joseph Loomis of Bristol, England, who came to America in the ship Susan and Ellen, in July, 1638, landing at Nantasket, and settling the next year in Windsor, Connecticut. Thus President Tuttle is doubly linked to that sterling race of men and women who laid the first foundations of New England.

Receiving a good sound education in the Hartford public grammar and high schools, Mr. Tuttle at twenty ears of age began his career as a railroad man, starting at the lowest grade and mastering one after another the elementary details of the great trade of transportation. He held positions successively with the Hartford, Providence & Fishkill, the New York & New England, the Eastern, the Boston & Maine, and the Canadian Pacific Railroads between 1865 and 1889, rising steadily from one grade to another through sheer merit and proved ability until, in 1889, he was called to the important post of commissioner of the Trunk Line Association. This was a notable mark of confidence in Mr. Tuttle on the part of his fellow railroad men. They believed not only in his practical ability but in his integrity and sense of justice.

This post of commissioner Mr. Tuttle had held but for about a year when he was offered and accepted the general management of the New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad, one of the most important railroad systems in the United States. Two years later Mr. Tuttle was promoted to the vice-presidency of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, resigning this place when a year later, in 1893, the directors of the Boston & Maine Railroad elected him the president of that system, which holds as important a relation to northern as the New York, New Haven & Hartford does to southern New England. In 1896 there was added to the honors and responsibilities of Mr. Tuttle the presidency of the Maine Central Railroad company. Thus Mr. Tuttle became the dominant personal factor in the northern New England railroad situation.

This record of unbroken progress is eloquent of the industry and power of Mr. Tuttle as a railroad manager -- of his genius for organization, for controlling men, and for meeting every emergency that arises in the complex and difficult work of transportation. His natural abilities are great, and they have been constantly broadened by his many years of large, practical experience. He is unquestionably one of the most remarkable of the men of power whom the American railroads of our time have developed. Mr. Tuttle has shown himself to be not only a great railroad manager, but a great force in every way in the rich and populous community served by the Boston & Maine system.

He has seen this system expand under his control until in point of mileage, and more particularly in tonnage carried, it has come to rank as one of the most efficient transportation plants in the entire world. The Boston & Maine under his management has more than kept pace with the demands of industrial New England. He has provided an ever-improving service, and at the same time has substantially lowered rates. The contrast between railroad conditions in northern New England when he took command and conditions now is manifest to every traveler and business man who is at all familiar with the Boston & Maine system. The advancement in the efficiency of this property has been achieved in such a sagacious way that never at any time has there been a serious strain upon the resources of the road, and it has become more valuable and profitable than ever to its stockholders. Mr. Tuttle’s career at the head of the Boston & Maine has been an era of unbroken and unparalleled prosperity.
Not only has Mr. Tuttle wrought a distinct evolution in the character of the local railroad service throughout northern New England, but he has improved the relations of the Boston & Maine system with the great trunk lines reaching the far West of the United States and Canada and tapping the mighty reservoirs of export trade. This has been an especially difficult undertaking because of the fierce competition of other ports and sections of the country, possessing many natural advantages and, moreover, aided often by discriminatory regulations and legislation. Nevertheless, President Tuttle has persevered and has been a masterful leader in the fight for fair play for Massachusetts and New England. He has made the Boston & Maine count more heavily than ever as a power in the export trade, to the profit of its owners and the benefit of the towns and cities through which its lines run to reach the seaboard.

Though a very busy man, President Tuttle has been conspicuous throughout his residence in Boston for his alert interest in large public affairs. He has contributed materially to the successful movement of the deepening and improvement of Boston Harbor so that its great terminal facilities may have the advantage of constant connection with the largest and, therefore, the most efficient and economical of ocean steamers. He has shown consummate tact and fairness in all his dealings with the great number of men in his employ, and he is recognized throughout New England as one of the wisest and most genuine of friends of industrious and deserving labor.

A member of many of the chief mercantile and philanthropic associations of Boston, Mr. Tuttle is one of the most conspicuous and influential citizens of the community. His habit of quick, decisive thought and frank expression has won for him a post of leadership in the consideration of many an important public question. He is a ready and forceful public speaker, combining the directness of the business man with much of the ease and grace of the finished and accustomed orator. President Tuttle has been called frequently year after year before legislative committees, and his counsel has been solicited and carefully studied by public men. His wide experience, his breadth of view and the confidence with which his fellow men have learned to listen to his judgment have been powerful to avert hostile legislation in the New England States and have helped mightily to hold their legislation along conservative lines at a time when the country at large has seemed to be seized with an infatuation for persecuting railroad properties.

Perhaps the railroads of some other states and sections would have been more fortunate if they had possessed more men like Mr. Tuttle who believe unequivocally in the principles of the Golden Rule and never forget that the great corporation has beery great and serious obligations to the public. Mr. Tuttle has always taken advanced views in regard to the duties of the railroads. He has advocated reasonable rates and has earnestly opposed preferential or discriminating rates. Time and time again he has urged in railroad conferences and elsewhere that first of all the freight rates of the country should be adjusted on a basis that all competent railroad men could maintain without injustice as between communities or individuals. Mr. Tuttle is a firm believer in co-operation and he holds that the laws of trade are inexorable, and that like the laws of nature they will in time prevail over all unwise attempted regulations which are contrary to the inherent necessities of trade and commerce. He does not disapprove of combinations that are properly organized and wisely and fairly managed -- and he has good proof here in his own system, which, unified and ably controlled along broad lines, has done far more than the old, separate, unsympathetic and discordant lines could do for the upbuilding of New England. President Tuttle believes in publicity as to all corporations whose securities the people are asked to invest. He is, in a word, a broad man of genuine statesmanlike caliber, of a type of which it would be well if there were many more in the railroad service of America.

His experience has covered every department of transportation, both of passengers and of freight. He has been brought for many years into close contact with people of many kinds. He has an intimate knowledge of human nature. His profession, as exacting in many ways as the most arduous military service, has kept his naturally great powers trained to the highest point of efficiency. Such a man is quick to understand and sympathize with other men, and is wonderfully well equipped for the leadership of other men in every undertaking for the benefit of the community.

A descendant of the Puritans, Mr. Tuttle is of the Congregationalist faith, and an active figure in the historic Old South church of Boston, which he and his family have attended for many years. He is a conspicuous member of the Old South club and a frequent speaker at the various conventions of the benevolent and social organizations of the church. Mr. Tuttle has been one of the Bostonians who have loyally upheld the work of the Young Men’s Christian Association and made it such a force in this community. He has been interested especially in the branches of the Association that have been devoted to the welfare of the young men employed in our railroad service, a line of effort in which the Association has been of late years notably active and successful.

President Tuttle has a fine, hospitable city home on Beacon Street, Brookline. He was married on October 14, 1875, to Estelle Hazen, daughter of George H. and Sarah (Hopkins) Martin, of Norwich, Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle have three daughters; all of them are married.

Mr. Tuttle is a member of the corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; a trustee of Clark College, Worcester; president of the New England civic Federation; director of the Second National Bank, Boston; director of the Old colony Trust company, Boston; member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce; member of the Algonquin, Commercial, and Merchants Clubs and of the Beacon Society.




from the Washington Post, December 1, 1914:

Brookline, Mass. Nov. 30 -- Lucius Tuttle, former president of the Boston and Maine Railroad, died tonight at his home here.

Death was due to angina pectoris.

Mr. Tuttle's health had been impaired since an operation three years ago, in shich one leg ws amputated. Notwithstanding this handicap he had continued many of his activities until a week ago, when the illness set in which resulted in his death late tonight.

Mr. Tuttle was born in Hartford, Conn., March 11, 1846. Forty-five years of his life were spent in railroading.

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Elam Tuttle1

b. 21 December 1810
     Elam Tuttle was born on 21 December 1810 at West Hartford, Hartford Co., CT.1 He was the son of Caleb Atwater Tuttle and Sally Reed.1 Elam Tuttle married Elizabeth Loomis, daughter of Benjamin Loomis and Mary Gaylord, on 24 March 1836.1

Children of Elam Tuttle and Elizabeth Loomis

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Caroline Emily Kingman1

b. 19 September 1861
     Caroline Emily Kingman was born on 19 September 1861 at Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT.1 She was the daughter of Samuel Clayton Kingman and Emily Eustis Brooks.1 Caroline Emily Kingman married Hiram Benjamin Loomis, son of Hiram Gaylord Loomis and Fidelia Holcombe, on 2 January 1890 at Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT.1

Children of Caroline Emily Kingman and Hiram Benjamin Loomis

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 587.
  2. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 588.

Elizabeth Loomis1

b. 20 May 1810, d. 13 September 1898
     Elizabeth Loomis was born on 20 May 1810 at CT.1 She was the daughter of Benjamin Loomis and Mary Gaylord.1 Elizabeth Loomis married Elam Tuttle, son of Caleb Atwater Tuttle and Sally Reed, on 24 March 1836.1 Elizabeth Loomis died on 13 September 1898 at age 88.1

Elam and Elizabeth were enumerated in the 1850 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer, age 39, she was 40. Children in the household were Cynthia E. 12, Jane E. 7, and Frederick L. 3.

Elam and Betsey were enumerated in the 1860 West Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer age 50, she was 50. Children in the household were Jane 17, and Frederick 14.

Elam and Betsey were enumerated in the 1870 West Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farmer, age 59, she was 60. There were no children in the household. Martha West, a 17-year-old teacher was boarding with them.

Elam and Betsey wre enumerated in the 1880 Hartford, Hartford Co., CT, federal census. He was a farm Laborer, age 69, she was 70. There was no one else in the household.

Children of Elizabeth Loomis and Elam Tuttle

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.

Cynthia Loomis1

b. 19 June 1812, d. 14 September 1813
     Cynthia Loomis was born on 19 June 1812 at CT.1 She was the daughter of Benjamin Loomis and Mary Gaylord.1 Cynthia Loomis died on 14 September 1813 at age 1.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Elisha Scott Loomis, Joseph Loomis, page 310.