Grace May Holcombe

b. 16 June 1877
     Grace May Holcombe was born on 16 June 1877 at MA.1 She was the daughter of Alfred Holcombe and Ellen Elvira Baker.

Citations

  1. [S35] 1900 Federal Census, unknown repository address.

Thomas Holcombe1,2

b. 7 November 1779, d. 18 December 1865
by Jan on findagrave.com
     Thomas Holcombe was born on 7 November 1779 at Granby, Hartford Co., CT.3 He was the son of Hezekiah Holcombe II and Chloe Pinney. Thomas Holcombe married Clarinda Pettibone, daughter of Gen. Chauncey Pettibone and Theodosia Hayes, on 3 January 1803 at Granby, Hartford Co., CT. Thomas Holcombe died on 18 December 1865 at age 86.4 He was buried at Holcomb Street, East Granby, Hartford Co., CT.

There is some confusion with this Thomas who married Clarinda Pettibone, and the Thomas who was the son of Thomas Holcombe and Sarah Loomis. Carol Laun of the Salmonbrook Historical Society confirms that Thomas, son of Hezekiah and Chloe (Pinney) was the correct spouse.

Thomas and Clarinda were enumerated in the 1850 Granby, Hartford Co., CT census. There were boarders in the household.

Children of Thomas Holcombe and Clarinda Pettibone

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 50.2/Item A-4-5-2-3-1-8-1.
  2. [S104] DAR DAR Lineage book, Vol. XX:Pg. 31/Item 19082.
  3. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 49.2.
  4. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 50.2.

Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe1

b. 11 December 1803
     Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe was born on 11 December 1803 at Granby, Hartford Co., CT.2 He was the son of Thomas Holcombe and Clarinda Pettibone. Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe married Rebecca Taylor, daughter of Bankston Taylor and Hester McWilliams, on 10 January 1839.

McPherson lists the birth date as 12 (11?).

Children of Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe and Rebecca Taylor

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 50.2/Item A-4-5-2-3-1-8-1.
  2. [S178] Christina Bailey and Lorraine Cook White, Barbour: Granby, Page 114.

Rebecca Taylor1

b. 23 February 1817 or 23 February 1818, d. 3 November 1851
     Rebecca Taylor was born on 23 February 1817 or 23 February 1818. She was the daughter of Bankston Taylor and Hester McWilliams. Rebecca Taylor married Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe, son of Thomas Holcombe and Clarinda Pettibone, on 10 January 1839. Rebecca Taylor died on 3 November 1851.

Children of Rebecca Taylor and Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 50.2/Item A-4-5-2-3-1-8-1.

Thomas Holcombe1,2

b. 13 July 1843
     Thomas Holcombe was born on 13 July 1843 at Del. He was the son of Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe and Rebecca Taylor. Thomas Holcombe married Elizabeth Hindman Barney, daughter of Jospeh Nicholson Barney and Eliza Jacobs Rogers, on 17 November 1868.

Trained in law at Harvard and served in the state legislature as well as, for may years, recorder of the City of Wilmington. Auditor of the United States Treasury in the administration of Grover Cleveland.

Children of Thomas Holcombe and Elizabeth Hindman Barney

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 51.1/Item A-4-5-2-3-1-8-1-2.
  2. [S177] Prof. John W. Gordon, "unknown short article title."

Elizabeth Hindman Barney1

b. 1847
     Elizabeth was a member of the DAR, # 92616, and provided, with her half-sister, the line to Commodore Barney. Elizabeth Hindman Barney was born in 1847 at New Castle Co., DE. She was the daughter of Jospeh Nicholson Barney and Eliza Jacobs Rogers. Elizabeth Hindman Barney married Thomas Holcombe, son of Chauncey Pettibone Holcombe and Rebecca Taylor, on 17 November 1868.

Children of Elizabeth Hindman Barney and Thomas Holcombe

Citations

  1. [S104] DAR DAR Lineage book, Vol. 93/Item 92616.

Gen. Thomas Holcombe1,2

b. 5 August 1879, d. 24 May 1965
General Thomas Holcomb
U.S. Marines
Time Magazine
     Gen. Thomas Holcombe was born on 5 August 1879 at Walnut Hill, Newcastle Co., Del. He was the son of Thomas Holcombe and Elizabeth Hindman Barney. Gen. Thomas Holcombe married Beatrice Miller Clover, daughter of Richardson Clover Rear Admiral, on 11 November 1916 at St. John's Church, Washington, DC. Gen. Thomas Holcombe died on 24 May 1965 at New Castle, DE, at age 85. He was buried on 28 May 1965 at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA; Section 3, Grave 2501-1.

from the official Marine Corps biography, dated December 1971:

General Thomas Holcomb, Seventeenth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, died May 25, 1965, in New Castle, Delaware, at the age of 85. Born on August 5, 1879, in New Castle, he attended private schools there until 1893, when his family moved to Washington, D.C. He was graduated from Western High School in Washington in 1897, and was appointed a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps on April 13, 1900.

General Holcomb was on detached duty with a company of Marines organized for service with a Marine battalion attached to the North Atlantic Fleet from September 1902 to April 1903. He was promoted to first lieutenant that year. He served in the Philippine Islands from April 1904 to August 1905, and in October and November 1906.

He was on duty with the Legation Guard, Peking, china, for one year in 1905 and 1906. He was appointed a captain in 1908, and from December of that year to July 1910, he again served with the Legation Guard at Peking. He continued on duty in Peking as Attaché on the Staff of the American Minister for study of the Chinese language and remained on that duty until May 1911. In December of that year, he was again ordered to the Legation at Peking to continue his study of the Chinese language, and remained in that capacity until May 1914.

General Holcomb has been prominently identified with the development of rifle shooting, and served as Inspector of Target Practice in the Marine Corps from October 1914 to August 1917. While serving in that capacity he was promoted to the rank of major in 1916. He was a member of the Marine Corps Rifle Teams of 1901, 1902, 1903, 1907, 1908, and 1911, and of teams representing the United States in the Palma Trophy Match in 1902 and 1903.

From August 1917 to January 1918, he commanded the Second Battalion, Sixth Marine Regiment, at the Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia, in preparation for overseas duty. From February 1918 to July of the next year, following his appointment to lieutenant colonel, he served with the A.E.F. in France. He commanded the Second Battalion from August 1918 and served as Second in Command of the Sixth Regiment, taking part in the Aisne Devensive (Chateau Thierry), the Aisne-Marne Offensive (Soissons), the Marbache Sector, the St. Mihiel Offensive, the Meuse-Argonne (Champagne) Offensive, the Meuse-Argonne (Argonne Forest) Offensive, and the March to the Rhine in Germany following the Armistice.

In recognition of his distinguished services in France, he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Silver Star with three Oak Leaf Clusters, a Meritorious Service Citation by the Commander-in-Chief, A.E.F., the Purple Heart, and was three times cited in General Orders of the Second Division, A.E.F. The French Government conferred on him the Cross of the Legion of Honor, and three times awarded him the Croix de Guerre with Palm.

From September 1922 to June 1924, he commanded the Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and on his return to the United States was ordered to the Command and General Staff School of the Army at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Upon completion of the course as a Distinguished Graduate, in June 1925, he was ordered to Headquarters Marine Corps for duty in the division of Operations and Training, where he remained until June 1927.

From August of that year to February 1930, General Holcomb commanded the Marine Detachment, American Legation, Peking, China. While serving there he was promoted to Colonel. In June 1930, he went to the naval War College as a student, Senior Course. He was graduated in June 1931. He was then ordered to the Army War College, graduating a year later.

From June 1932 to January 1935, prior to his appointment to brigadier general, he served in the Office of Naval Operations, Navy Department. He then served as Commandant of the Marine Corps Schools at Quantico, Virginia, until November 1936, when he was ordered to Marine Corps Headquarters to assume the office of the Major General Commandant on December 1, 1936.

With his advancement to lieutenant general on January 20, 1942, pursuant to an Act of Congress, the Commandant became the highest-ranking officer ever to command the Marine Corps up to that time.


On August 5, 1943, when Lieutenant General Holcomb reached the regular retirement age, the President announced he was continuing General Holcomb as Commandant of the Marine Corps, in recognition of his outstanding services in that capacity.

After nearly 44 years as a Marine, General Holcomb was retired on January 1, 1944. Because he had been specially commended for his performance of duty in actual combat, he was advanced one rank on the retired list in accordance with a newly passed Act of Congress. He thus became the first marine ever to hold the rank of general. In a letter to General Holcomb, the late Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox said, "You will be the first officer of the Corps to hold the rank of general -- the highest rank in our armed forces. I know of no other officer to whom that distinction more fittingly belongs."

During General Holcomb's tour of duty as commandant, the Marine Corps expanded from 16,000 men to about 300,000 men and women. The general was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for his outstanding work as Commandant in April 1944.

On March 9, 1944, the President nominated General Holcomb for the position of United States Minister to the Union of South Africa. The Senate confirmed the nomination on March 20 and the general was commissioned as such on the next day.

He resigned as Minister to the Union of South Africa on June 15, 1948, and lived at Rose Croft, St. Mary's City, Maryland, where he managed the family farm until 1956. He then moved to Chevy Chase, Maryland, where he continued his interest in gardening. In 1962, he moved to an apartment in "The Towers" in Washington, D.C. Following a serious illness in the spring of 1964, he returned to his native New Castle, Delaware, making his home at 125 East Third Street.

General Holcomb's wife was the late Beatrice Miller Clover of Washington, D. C. They were married in 1916. Mrs. Holcomb died in 1962. Their only son, Franklin P., served as a Marine officer during World War II, and is now a lieutenant colonel, United States Marine Corps Reserve, (Retired.)

A list of General Holcomb's medals and decorations includes: the Navy Cross; the Distinguished Service Medal; the Silver Star Medal with three Oak-Leaf Clusters; the Purple Heart Medal; the Expeditionary Medal, China; the World War I Victory Medal with Aisne, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne and Defensive Sector clasps; the Army of Occupation of Germany Medal; the American Defense Service Medal with Base clasp; the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one bronze star, Guadalcanal; the American Campaign Medal; the World War II Victory Medal; the French Legion of Honor; the French Croix de Guerre with three palms; the Naval Order of Merit, First Class (Cuban award), 1943; the Knight Grand Cross (Netherlands), 1944; and the French Fourragere.


From Time 11 November 1940: When he is not out of Washington on inspection trips, General Holcomb, trim and blocky in dark mufti, gets to his office at 8:30, usually has plenty of time to chat during the day. Favorite Topic: rifle-shooting. Member of the Marine rifle team between 1901 and 1911, high gun in the international matches in Canada in 1902, he wears the gold medal of the distinguished marksman (a sort of super-expert) below the ribbons of the Navy Cross, Legion of Honor and other decorations. Most of them he won as a battalion commander in the Marine Brigade of the A.E. F.

Weekends he and Mrs. Holcomb (daughter of the late Rear Admiral Richardson Clover) drop down the Potomac in their 50-foot yacht Slow Boat, are sometimes called back for official business by a message carried down river by Marine Corps plane. On office days Tommy Holcomb goes home at 4:30 to the Commandant's quarters at Eighth and G Streets Southeast, alongside the Marine Barracks, where Commandants have lived in unbroken succession since the house was built in 1805. Quaint, spacious, fitted with authentic reproductions of its original furnishings, the house is also the centerpiece of one of the Corps' favorite yarns. Colonel Archibald Henderson, fifth Commandant, lived there for 39 years, go so used to the place that he forgot it was government property, solemnly willed it to his son.

Child of Gen. Thomas Holcombe and Beatrice Miller Clover

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 51.2/Item A-4-5-2-3-1-8-1-2-3.
  2. [S177] Prof. John W. Gordon, "unknown short article title."

Beatrice Miller Clover

b. 23 January 1896, d. 14 August 1962
     Beatrice Miller Clover was born on 23 January 1896. She was the daughter of Richardson Clover Rear Admiral. Beatrice Miller Clover married Gen. Thomas Holcombe, son of Thomas Holcombe and Elizabeth Hindman Barney, on 11 November 1916 at St. John's Church, Washington, DC. Beatrice Miller Clover died on 14 August 1962 at age 66.

Child of Beatrice Miller Clover and Gen. Thomas Holcombe

Lt. Col. Franklin Porteous Holcombe

b. 13 October 1917, d. 30 June 1991
     Lt. Col. Franklin Porteous Holcombe was born on 13 October 1917 at Washington, DC. He was the son of Gen. Thomas Holcombe and Beatrice Miller Clover. Lt. Col. Franklin Porteous Holcombe died on 30 June 1991 at Washington Hospice, Washington, DC, at age 73.

from The Washington Times, July 5, 1991:
Franklin specialized in political issues in the Foreign Service and served in Washington, Switzerland, Italy, Argentina, France and Algeria. He retired in 1975. During World War II, Mr. Holcombe served in Europe and North Africa as a lieutenant colonel in the Marine Corps reserves, participating in Allied landings in France, Morocco and Sicily. Born in the District, he lived here and at Marine facilities in the United States, Cuba and China while growing up. He attended Sidwell Friends School and graduated from St. George's School, a preparatory school in Rhode Island. He attended University of Heidelberg in Germany in 1937 and later graduated from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in 1939.

Mr. Holcombe, a yachtsman and an ocean sailboat racer, was a member of both the New York Yacht Club and the Cruising Club of the Chesapeake. He also belonged to the Chevy Chase Club and the Metropolitan Club.

Child of Lt. Col. Franklin Porteous Holcombe and Suzanne Slingluff

Mary L. Palmer

     Mary L. Palmer was the daughter of Leman Palmer and Salome Root. Mary L. Palmer married Birney G. Holcombe, son of Milton Holcombe and Elvira Gillett, on 5 June 1870.

Children of Mary L. Palmer and Birney G. Holcombe

Simeon Palmer

     Simeon Palmer was the son of Leman Palmer and Salome Root. Simeon Palmer married Emma Holcombe, daughter of Milton Holcombe and Elvira Gillett, on 29 April 1869.

Children of Simeon Palmer and Emma Holcombe

Sarah Elizabeth Holcombe

b. 15 October 1872
     Sarah Elizabeth Holcombe was born on 15 October 1872. She was the daughter of Birney G. Holcombe and Mary L. Palmer.

Helen Elvira Holcombe

b. 4 April 1876, d. 1918
     Helen Elvira Holcombe was born on 4 April 1876. She was the daughter of Birney G. Holcombe and Mary L. Palmer. Helen Elvira Holcombe died in 1918.

Ellen L. Butler

b. 21 September 1842
     Ellen L. Butler was born on 21 September 1842. She was the daughter of Burrage Yale Butler and Maria Louisa Forward. Ellen L. Butler married Wallace Holcombe, son of Milton Holcombe and Elvira Gillett, on 6 April 1875.

Child of Ellen L. Butler and Wallace Holcombe

Burrage Yale Butler

     Burrage Yale Butler was the son of Divan Butler. Burrage Yale Butler married Maria Louisa Forward, daughter of Gen. Joseph Morton Forward and Fanny Moore.

Child of Burrage Yale Butler and Maria Louisa Forward

Maria Louisa Forward

b. 28 September 1818, d. 12 December 1858
     Maria Louisa Forward was born on 28 September 1818.1 She was the daughter of Gen. Joseph Morton Forward and Fanny Moore. Maria Louisa Forward married Burrage Yale Butler, son of Divan Butler. Maria Louisa Forward died on 12 December 1858 at age 40.1

Child of Maria Louisa Forward and Burrage Yale Butler

Citations

  1. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 76.

Divan Butler

     Divan Butler was the son of Comfort Butler.

Child of Divan Butler

Comfort Butler

     Comfort Butler was the son of John Butler III.

Child of Comfort Butler

John Butler III

     John Butler III was the son of John Butler II.

Child of John Butler III

John Butler II

     John Butler II was the son of John Butler Dr.

Child of John Butler II

John Butler Dr.

     John Butler's father was Richard Butler, the immigrant.

Child of John Butler Dr.

Gen. Joseph Morton Forward

b. 22 January 1785, d. 21 December 1860
     Gen. Joseph Morton Forward was born on 22 January 1785 at Granby, Hartford Co., CT. He was the son of Joseph Forward II and Mary Owen.1 Gen. Joseph Morton Forward married Fanny Moore, daughter of Roger Moore and Rosetta Hayes.2 Gen. Joseph Morton Forward died on 21 December 1860 at Southwick, Hampden Co., MA, at age 75.3

Children of Gen. Joseph Morton Forward and Fanny Moore

Citations

  1. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 64.
  2. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 45.
  3. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 76.
  4. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 8.

Joseph Forward II

b. 11 February 1759, d. between 18 July 1840 and 16 June 1841
     Joseph Forward II was born on 11 February 1759 at Simsbury, Hartford Co., CT.1 He was the son of Joseph Forward and Ruth Morton.2 Joseph Forward II died between 18 July 1840 and 16 June 1841.1

Child of Joseph Forward II and Mary Owen

Citations

  1. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 64.
  2. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 33.

Joseph Forward

b. 16 December 1733, d. 1810
     Joseph Forward was born on 16 December 1733.1 He was the son of Joseph Forward and Marcy Lourton.2 Joseph Forward died in 1810 at Granby, Hartford Co., CT.1

Child of Joseph Forward and Ruth Morton

Citations

  1. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 33.
  2. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 16.

Joseph Forward

b. 10 November 1709
     Joseph Forward was born on 10 November 1709.1 He was the son of Samuel Forward and Deborah Moore.2 Joseph Forward married Marcy Lourton on 27 March 1729 at Simsbury, Hartford Co., CT.1 His estate was probated on 11 December 1759.

Child of Joseph Forward and Marcy Lourton

Citations

  1. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 16.
  2. [S414] Hon. Horace L. Moore, Andrew Moore, Page 8.

Viola Louise Holcombe1

b. 19 June 1884
     Viola graduated in 1906 with a BS degree from Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO; MA from Radcliffe College, Cambridge, MA; taught Mt Holyoke College, MA; PA college for Women, Pittsburg; philosophy and psychology, Wilson College, Chambersburg, PA. Viola Louise Holcombe was born on 19 June 1884 at Southwick, Hampden Co., MA. She was the daughter of Wallace Holcombe and Ellen L. Butler.

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 114.1/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-2-7-1.

Keturah Dibble

b. 9 December 1821
     Keturah Dibble was born on 9 December 1821 at Southwick, Hampden Co., MA. She was the daughter of Reuben W. Dibble and Hulda Adams. Keturah Dibble married Henry Holcombe, son of Amassa Holcombe II and Gillett Kendall, on 27 March 1843.

Housatonic Republican
Falls Village, Connecticut
Saturday, December 3, 1859

Horrible Tragedy

We give below some of the general particulars of a shocking attempt at murder, in the town of Southwick, adjoining Westfield in the south. It appears that on Thursday afternoon, the 17th inst., a little son of Mr Henry Holcomb of Southwick, an only child of seven years upon returning home from school about 5 o’clock found his father and mother absent from home and the house vacant. Supposing that they had gone to a remote part of the town on a visit, he passed the night with a neighboring uncle, and in the morning returned home, and not finding any one in the house finally opened the cellar door and called, “Mother" when some one as he thought, answered ‘what?" He procured a light, and went nearly down the stairway, when he discovered his mother lying in one corner of the cellar near the foot of the stairs insensible, and covered with blood. He was frightened and returned to the kitchen, where he found his cousin Emma, who had come over to see what had become of him — He said, “ mother is in the cellar and has fallen and hurt herself.” Emma went immediately home, and her father and brother, went to the house, and took Mrs. Holcomb from' the cellar.— She was still insensible and unable to give an account of what had happened. Her left eye was badly bruised and blackened, and the back part of her head was beaten almost to a mass of jelly, bearing indications of having received seven distinct blows, running transversely across her head. At the foot of the front room stairway a small hand basket was found together with some potato peelings and a pool of blood, a heavy oak scantling. five feet long and three by four inches in thickness was near by covered with blood, and a portion of her scalp was also found on it. The cellar wall, at the same place on one side, and boxes and barrels, and the bottom of the cellar generally were covered with blood. Mrs. Holcomb was found in the opposite end of the cellar, and from appearances it was evident that she had crawled all about the cellar during the night in endeavoring to get out.

No signs of blood were found out of the cellar except on Mr. Holcomb's clothes, which he had taken off and left in the bed room where he changed himself. Mrs. Holcomb when the physician arrived, asked who had beaten her and she replied, "Henry," meaning her husband, since which she has been entirely insensible.

It would appear that she had gone to the cellar for potatoes, when perhaps, her husband became from some cause enraged, struck her in the left eye with his fist and knocked her down and then beat her head. Supposing that she was dead he went to change his clothes, and fled, and was last seen on Thursday afternoon, by some boys who were hunting in the woods about one mile west of his house, and going west.

Henry Holcomb, the murderer, is a son of the Hon. Amasa Holcomb, formally a Methodist minister, who has represented Southwick and Hamden county two sessions in the House of Representatives and one in the state Senate. Mr. Holcomb is a large man, about 37 years old, six feet high, with dark hair and eyes, and weighs 168 lbs. He was a very strict temperance man, was of sound mind, and never exhibited
the least sign of insanity. He was strictly upright in all his dealings with his neighbors, and was a very pious man — was a member of the Methodist church, a leader of the choir, and always held daily prayers at home.

As far as the town's people generally knew himself and wife lived together on good terms, but there existed an ill feeling between them, and that they were far from living together happily. - He was a man of strong feelings when aroused, and never forgot an injury, and when provoked by his animals he treated them with cruelty. He was very stern in his disposition, and lacked those finer domestic feelings that impart happiness and love to the family household.

Mrs Holcomb on the other hand possessed a remarkable loving and tender nature and is of that class of women who want sympathy and affection, and long to feel the out gushings of a kindred soul She is 38 years old. about medium height, with brown, curly hair, light eyes, and pleasant and intelligent, countenance. Mrs.Holcomb's father was insane 25 years. and a brother has recently been confined in the Northampton hospital for insanity, and it is thought she has shown symptoms of the same disease.

The selectmen of the town have offered a reward of $200 for the arrest of Mr. Holcomb.

Later news says Mrs. Holcomb is much better, and she says her husband called me down cellar and knocked me down with his fist, and then bounded me with a club.”Holcomb's father and wife publishes a card desiring him to come home.

Holcomb, voluntarily returned to his father's house last week Monday evening. He had managed to get to Philadelphia, where he had spent Sunday: and where he seems to have concluded that his better way was to return immediately to Southwick. With remarkable thoughtfulness for the pecuniary interests of the town which had offered the large sum of $l50 for his arrest, the constable took a written acknowledgment that he had surrendered voluntarily; to protect the town from payment of any reward to the officers who had spent nights and days in most harassing searches and left the murderer with his father Hon Amasa Holcomb, as honorary keeper. In the course of twenty-four hours however, the impropriety of such a step occurred to some one, and a legal warrant was issued upon which Holcomb was lodged in the lockup at Westfield, to spend Tuesday night.

Mrs Holcomb, the victim, was alive at our latest advices, but was conscious only at intervals, and at no time sufficiently clear in mind to explain the transaction. The occasional ejaculation and half-spoken sentences she utters, presents the crime of her husband with most hideous features. Holcomb says his wife was “ still sensible” when he left her ; he is reserved, but makes no effort to fasten the crime on any other person. His father is a venerable man of 70 years, and his tearful cry. “ It has almost killed me—' don't know but it will quiet!, touched the feelings even of them who made the arrest. Holcomb was taken from the family table, the evening meal still smoking thereon, his father, mother, sister and brother, being at his side, and yearning still to protect him; and lodged where he rightfully belongs; in lonesome prison.

Child of Keturah Dibble and Henry Holcombe

Amassa Holcombe1

b. 7 October 1852, d. 17 August 1921
     Amassa Holcombe was born on 7 October 1852 at Southwick, Hampden Co., MA. He was the son of Henry Holcombe and Keturah Dibble. Amassa Holcombe died on 17 August 1921 at Westfield Hospital, Westfield, Hampden Co., MA, at age 68.

Children of Amassa Holcombe and Eleanor Bronson

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 114.2/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-6-1.

Crace E. Holcombe

b. 13 January 1876
     Crace E. Holcombe was born on 13 January 1876. Crace E. Holcombe was the child of Amassa Holcombe and Eleanor Bronson.

Eva C. Holcombe

b. 17 June 1881
     Eva C. Holcombe was born on 17 June 1881. She was the daughter of Amassa Holcombe and Eleanor Bronson.

Mary E. Gibbons

     Mary E. Gibbons was the daughter of James Gibbons and Philura (?) Mary E. Gibbons married Franklin Holcombe, son of Amassa Holcombe II and Gillett Kendall, on 27 November 1851 at Southwick, Hampden Co., MA.

Child of Mary E. Gibbons and Franklin Holcombe

James Gibbons

d. 9 January 1853
     James Gibbons died on 9 January 1853.

Children of James Gibbons and Philura (?)

Eliza Gibbons

     Eliza Gibbons was the daughter of James Gibbons and Philura (?) Eliza Gibbons married Franklin Holcombe, son of Amassa Holcombe II and Gillett Kendall.

Sarah Jane Robinson

     Sarah Jane Robinson married Franklin Holcombe, son of Amassa Holcombe II and Gillett Kendall.

Children of Sarah Jane Robinson and Franklin Holcombe

Frank Gibbons Holcombe1

b. 26 January 1852
     Frank Gibbons Holcombe was born on 26 January 1852 at Southwick, Hampden Co., MA. He was the son of Franklin Holcombe and Mary E. Gibbons.

A lawyer in Boston, MA.

Children of Frank Gibbons Holcombe and Inez Norman Maynard

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 114.2/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-8-1.

Charles Henry Holcombe1

b. 14 November 1859
     Moved in 1872 from Southwick, MA to Wilton; grad Harvard Medical College 1886; settled to practice in Milford, 1888; moved to Brookline, MA; member of Med Ass'n; amateur botanist. Charles Henry Holcombe was born on 14 November 1859. He was the son of Franklin Holcombe and Sarah Jane Robinson. Charles Henry Holcombe married Clintina A. Burton, daughter of James E. Burton and Olive A. Robinson, on 23 June 1888.

Child of Charles Henry Holcombe and Clintina A. Burton

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 115.1/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-8-2.

Newton Franklin Holcombe1

b. 7 October 1861
     Newton Franklin Holcombe was born on 7 October 1861. He was the son of Franklin Holcombe and Sarah Jane Robinson.

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 115.1/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-8-3.

Frank M. Holcombe

b. 11 October 1880
     Frank M. Holcombe was born on 11 October 1880 at Winchester, MA. He was the son of Frank Gibbons Holcombe and Inez Norman Maynard.

Amassa Maynard Holcombe1

b. 27 October 1882
     Amassa Maynard Holcombe was born on 27 October 1882 at Winchester, MA. He was the son of Frank Gibbons Holcombe and Inez Norman Maynard. Amassa Maynard Holcombe married Eleanor Pearl Marshall, daughter of John T. Marshall and Susan Priscilla McKenney, on 7 September 1909.

AB in ME, MIT, 1904, George Washington Univ. Law School; admitted to DC Bar 1910; Asst. Examiner US Patent Office 1907-10, Special Asst. to Atty-Gen'l Court of Claims, 1920-26, patent lawyer, 438 Munsey Bldg. Washington, DC.


Amasa M. and and Eleanor M. were enumerated in the 1930 Washington DC, federal census. He was a patent and trade lawyer, age 47; she was 47. Children in the household were Lucille 16, and Marshall M. 15.

Children of Amassa Maynard Holcombe and Eleanor Pearl Marshall

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 114.2/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-8-1-2.

Arthur Norman Holcombe1

b. 3 November 1884, d. December 1977
     Arthur Norman Holcombe was born on 3 November 1884 at Winchester, MA. He was the son of Frank Gibbons Holcombe and Inez Norman Maynard. Arthur Norman Holcombe died in December 1977 at Milton Village, Norfolk, MA, at age 93.

20 Berkeley St. Cambridge, MA and Duxbury, Harvard University, AB, 1906, PhD, 1909, studied in universities in Berlin and Paris and in London School of Economics and Political Science; holds chair of Government in Harvard university; was Visiting Prof. Chinese national University, 1935. From 1912-35 has served long memberships on 8 or more committees of State and national importance and influence in the fields of his specialization and with many similar organizations of national or greater range. He has constantly contributed to national magazines and publications extensive treatises in his field of activity, principally science of government; served 1944 with Appeals Board of War Production Board.


Arthur and Carolyn were enumerated in the 1930 Cambridge, Middlesex Co., MA, federal census. He was a professor age 45, she was 37. Children in the household were Waldo 18, Mary 15, Robert 14, Jan 12, and Richard 10.

Children of Arthur Norman Holcombe and Carolyn Hawley Crossett

Citations

  1. [S25] Hannah McPherson, Holcombe Genealogy, Page 114.2/Item A-8-1-1-9-1-3-8-1-3.

Elizabeth Holcombe

b. 27 August 1886
     Elizabeth Holcombe married Carl A. Norman. Elizabeth Holcombe was born on 27 August 1886 at Winchester, MA. She was the daughter of Frank Gibbons Holcombe and Inez Norman Maynard.

Children of Elizabeth Holcombe and Carl A. Norman