Reuchlin Wright

b. 17 March 1861
     Reuchlin Wright was born on 17 March 1861.1 He was the son of Milton Wright and Susan Catharine Koerner.

Child of Reuchlin Wright and Lulu Billheimer

Citations

  1. [S296] Tom Crouch, Wright Brothers, Page 39.

Lorin Wright

b. 18 November 1862
     Lorin Wright was born on 18 November 1862.1 He was the son of Milton Wright and Susan Catharine Koerner.

Citations

  1. [S296] Tom Crouch, Wright Brothers, Page 39.

Katharine Wright

b. 19 August 1874
     Katharine Wright was born on 19 August 1874. She was the daughter of Milton Wright and Susan Catharine Koerner.

Matthew Walker Holcombe

b. 7 March 1986, d. June 2016
     Matthew Walker Holcombe was born on 7 March 1986 at Atlanta, GA. He was the son of Walter Stuart Holcombe and Vicki Darlene Walker. Matthew Walker Holcombe died in June 2016 at Roswell, Fulton Co., GA, at age 30.

Major Thomas Hill1

b. 3 October 1789, d. 6 January 1857
     Major Thomas Hill was born on 3 October 1789. He was the son of Colonel Henry Hill and Anne Powell. Major Thomas Hill married Fannie Russell Baptist, daughter of William Glanville Baptist and Mary Langston, in November 1811. Major Thomas Hill died on 6 January 1857 at age 67.2 He was buried at Fairview Cemetery, Culpeper, Culpeper Co., VA.3

From "General A.P. Hill: The Story of a Confederate Warrior"

"Another son, Thomas Hill, born October 3, 1789, also crossed back into Culpeper County to make his fortune. His November 1811 marriage to Fannie Russell Baptist was a merger of two proud lines. She was a native of Mecklenburg County and was descended from the Earl of Gainsboro in Charles II's reign. Fannie Hill was a nineteen-year-old bride when she arrived at Thomas Hill's new estate, Greenland, ten miles west of the town of Culpeper Court House. "Husband and wife soon developed contrasting life styles. Thomas Hill became a highly esteemed merchant, farmer, and politician. An acquaintance recalled that he `was a splendid looking man, tall, taciturn, noted for his courage, famed for his hospitality and beloved for his character.' People called him Major out of respect. Fannie Hill, on the other hand, was a small, frail, bespectacled introvert who had difficulty controlling her emotions. She tended to keep to herself, preferring to sit by the window, knitting or gazing out across the fields. Most of her married life she spent battling `ills real or imaginary,' a family member stated, and she was `much petted by her husband and children.' "The union of Thomas and Fannie Hill produced seven children: four sons followed by three daughters. "In the mid-1830s, Major Hill moved his family into the town of Culpeper Court House to be nearer his expanding mercantile business. The Hills settled into a large, three-story brick residence at th corner of Main and Davis streets.


Thomas and Frances R. were enumerated in the 1850 Fairfax, Culpeper Co., VA, federal census. He was a merchant age 61, she was 58. Children in the household were Lucy R. 16, Henry Hill 34 in the USA, Frances E. Hill 34, Francis F. 10, and Henry J. 7. Enumerated next door was Edward B. Hill and his family.

Children of Major Thomas Hill and Fannie Russell Baptist

Citations

  1. [S26] Raleigh Travers Green, Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper County, Virginia, Page 85.
  2. [S684] James I. Robertson Jr., General A. P. Hill, page 29.
  3. [S807] Find A Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com, memorial # 14241557.

Fannie Russell Baptist

b. 1789, d. 1853
     Fannie Russell Baptist was born in 1789. She was the daughter of William Glanville Baptist and Mary Langston. Fannie Russell Baptist married Major Thomas Hill, son of Colonel Henry Hill and Anne Powell, in November 1811. Fannie Russell Baptist died in 1853.1 She was buried at Fairview Cemetery, Culpeper, Culpeper Co., VA.1

From "General A. P. Hill" by James I. Robertson, Jr.: His (Thomas Hill's) November 1811 marriage to Fannie Russell Baptist was a merger of two proud lines. She was a native of Mecklenburg County and was descended from the Earl of Gainsboro in Charles II's reign. Fannie Hill was a nineteen-year-old bride when she arrived at Thomas Hill's new estate, Greenland, ten miles west of the town of Culpeper Court House.

Children of Fannie Russell Baptist and Major Thomas Hill

Citations

  1. [S807] Find A Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com, memorial # 14245962.

General Ambrose Powell Hill

b. 9 November 1825, d. 2 April 1865
General Ambrose Powell Hill
1825-1865
     General Ambrose Powell Hill was born on 9 November 1825 at Culpeper, Culpeper Co., VA. He was the son of Major Thomas Hill and Fannie Russell Baptist. General Ambrose Powell Hill married Kitty Grosh Morgan on 18 July 1859. General Ambrose Powell Hill died on 2 April 1865 at Petersburg, VA, at age 39. He was buried in 1891 at Richmond, VA.

From "General A. P. Hill The Story of a Confederate Warrior" by James I. Robertson, Jr., 1987. The Hill family was representative of the landed gentry of north-central Virginia. Two centuries prior to the Civil War, the Hills had planted their roots in the rolling piedmont country of the Old Dominion. The taproot of the family stretched back to twelfth-century England and may have touched royalty. Some evidence suggests that the Hulls (as the family name was first spelled) were descended from Hamlet Plantagenet, a son of King Henry II. Succeeding generations maintained respectability but without excess wealth. The colonization of Virginia seemed to offer unlimited opportunity, and in 1630--barely twenty years after the first settlement at Jamestown-- Henry Hill of Shropshire and his brother William migrated to America. They settled in what became Middlesex County, where the Rappahannock River empties into Chesapeake Bay. Both brothers raised tobacco and children in large quantities. As the family expanded in the ever-expanding country, it was inevitable that some members would seek new horizons. In 1740 Russell Hill, a great-grandson of William, moved inland to the land between the mountains and the flat country. He became an original settler of Clupeper County, Va., created in 1748 after being officially surveyed by George Washington. Russell Hill carved out an estate in the area known as the Wilderness, dubbed it Stranger's Rest, and followed in the family footsteps by becoming both prosperous and prolific. A neighbor and associate of this Hill was an extraordinary Capt. Ambrose Powell: Indian fighter, Kentucky explorer, justice of the peace, sheriff, legislator, and close friend of President James Madison. Russell's son Henry (1743-1815) married Anne Powell, daughter of the prominent Virginian. Henry Hill served in the Revolutionary War under Col. "Light Horse Harry" Lee and then built Millwood, an estate of several thousand acres in nearby Madison County, Va. Henry Hill has been described as "a very large man," a description that certainly fits the wealth and influence he ultimately possessed. Five children came from the marriage of Henry Hill and Anne Powell. One son, Ambrose Powell Hill (1758-1858), served in both houses of the Virginia legis- lature in addition to being elected captain of the Culpeper Minute Men milita. Another son, Thomas Hill, born October 3, 1789, also crossed back into Culpeper County to make his fortune. His November marriage to Fannie Russell Baptist was a merger of two proud lines. She was a native of Mecklenburg County and was descended from the earl of Gainsboro in Charles II's reign. Fannie Hill was a nineteen-year-old bride when she arrived at Thomas Hill's new estate, Greenland, ten miles west of the town of Culpeper Court House. Husband and wife soon developed contrsting life styles. Thomas Hill became a highly esteemed merchant, farmer, and politician. An acquaintance recalled that he "was a splendid looking man, tall, taciturn, noted for his courage, famed for his hospitality and beloved for his character." People called him Major out of respect. Fannie Hill, on the other hand, was a small, frail, bespectacled introvert who had difficulty controlling her emotions. She tended to keep to herself, preferring to sit by the window, knitting or gazing out across the fields. Most of her married life she spent battling "ills real or imaginary," a family member stated, and she was 'much petted by her husband and children." The union of Thomas and Fannie Hill produced seven children: four sons followed by three daughters. At eight in the morning on November 9, 1825, the last son was born. He was appropriately namd Ambrose Powell Hill Jr. Powell (as he was called throughout his life) enjoyed a pleasant childhood.

He entered the United States Military Academy at West Point in the summer of 1842 as a member of the famed class of 1846, but an embarrassing illness contracted on summer furlough resulted in Hill being sent home to recover his health in his junior year. Returning, he graduated 15th in the class of 1847 and was posted to the artillery.

Sent to Mexico, he saw little action as the United States war with Mexico had already drawn to a conclusion, unlike most of his former classmates in the Class of '46. His antebellum army years were marked by service in Florida and with the U.S. Coast Survey. Upon the outbreak of war he resigned as a First Lieutenant to cast his lot with the South because of a strong belief in states rights and because he felt it was his duty to defend the honor of Virginia. He was given command of the 13th Virginia as colonel. Seeing little action in the West Virginia Romney Campaign, he saw action at Yorktown and Williamsburg. Recommended for promotion, in a mere 90 days he had jumped from Colonel to Major General. Seeing action in the series of battles around Richmond known collectively as the "Seven Days," he established a reputation for great bravery, skill, and aggressiveness while leading what became known as the Light Division. A sharp feud and supposed challenge to a duel involving his commander James Longstreet about a newspaper account about a battle during the Seven Days resulted in Hill being transferred to the command of former classmate and a man who proved to be totally incompatible with Hill as far as personality, T.J. Jackson.

Despite a severe and on going quarrel with the dour Jackson that led to his eventual arrest, Hill distinguished himself at Cedar Mountain, Second Manassas, and the capture of Harper's Ferry.

While technically still under arrest, he made a brilliant, rapid march to Sharpsburg to save the day and battle in his finest hour as a battlefield commander. His performance at Fredericksburg in December was lackluster, however, and he left an infamous gap in his line. Over the winter he continued the ugly argument with Jackson, demanding a court martial to investigate Hill's conduct and to exonerate him, but Lee pretty much shelved the argument.

In May of 1863, at Chancellorsville, he was on Jackson's famed flank march and took command of the corps when Jackson fell wounded in the arm on the night of the 2nd. Soon after, a shell struck Hill in the back of the legs, knocking him from further command.

With Jackson's death later and subsequent reorganization of the Army of Northern Virginia, Hill received command of the newly formed Third Corps (and promotion to the rank of Lieutenant General) which he led in the Gettysburg campaign.
His men began the battle, though he was ill on the first day of the fighting. On the second and third days, his men were effectively turned over to other commands. In the fall of 1863, Hill made the mistake of failing to conduct proper reconnaissance and met with bloody disaster at Bristoe Station. Illness struck him again at the Wilderness in the spring of 1864, almost resulting in a disaster when he could not ride out and reorganize his tired men and lines. He missed the battle of Spotsylvania because of the illness, but followed the troops anyway in an ambulance. He returned in time for the battles along the North Anna and Cold Harbor.

His men held many of the main lines around Petersburg during the siege and were involved in most of the major engagements. Walter Taylor, Lee's aide, would later write that the Petersburg campaign was "the diary of the command of A.P. Hill". Sickness, that seemed to worsen as the siege dragged on, continued to plague him causing him to often take brief leaves of absence. Returning from illness and a sick leave on the morning of April 2, 1865, Hill painfully rode out to try and rally his collapsing lines. In the process he was shot through the heart by a stray group of soldiers from the Union Sixth Corps. He died instantly. With tears in his eyes, Lee remarked very sadly, "He is at rest now and we who are left are the ones to suffer."

Then the race was on to bury him appropriately -- and before nature took its course and ravaged his body even further.

Research by the Pickett Society indicates that the first burial came not where some Civil War researchers believe it was, at Bellgrade Plantation, near Huguenot and Robious roads in Chesterfield County. Pickett Society records at the Virginia Historical Society and other research from local historians and authors, instead indicate that Hill was buried in an area south of the James River near Bosher's Dam, in what is now the city of Richmond.

Hill lay in that grave for two years before he was unearthed and his remains transferred in the autumn of 1867 to Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, which was where some of his former soldiers wanted him. In 1891, the remains were moved again and buried under a statue erected in Hill's honor at the current intersection of Laburnum Avenue and Hermitage Road. He was buried standing up.

Children of General Ambrose Powell Hill and Kitty Grosh Morgan

Jehu Bates1

b. 12 June 1795, d. 1 July 1876
     Information from Carolyn P. Drennen 3841 Valley Head Rd. Birmingham, AL 35223 on 15 March 1982; copied from Bates Family Bible. Jehu Bates was born on 12 June 1795 at Clermont Co., SC. He was the son of James Bates and Mary Sones. Jehu Bates married Jannet Barnes, daughter of James Barnes and Mary Lenoir, on 22 August 1816. Jehu Bates died on 1 July 1876 at Nanafalia, Marengo Co., AL, at age 81.

Child of Jehu Bates and Jannet Barnes

Citations

  1. [S29] Pauline Jones Gandrud, Alabama Records, Volume 39, Marengo County, Book A, Page 50.

Jannet Barnes

b. 15 April 1794, d. 17 June 1851
     Jannet Barnes was also known as Janncy Barnes. She was born on 15 April 1794 at SC. She was the daughter of James Barnes and Mary Lenoir. Jannet Barnes married Jehu Bates, son of James Bates and Mary Sones, on 22 August 1816. Jannet Barnes died on 17 June 1851 at Nanafalia, Marengo Co., AL, at age 57.

Information provided by Carolyn P. Drennen 3841 Valley Head Rd. Birmingham, AL 35223 on 15 March 1982; and by Linda Rogers Weiss, Greenville, SC on 14 Jun 2003.

Child of Jannet Barnes and Jehu Bates

Anna Skinner

b. 1831
     From THE SKINNER KINSMEN Volume I, the Descendants of Richard Skinner of North Carolina, comppiled by Doris Seymour Wahl and Cynthia Walker Rummel. Anna Skinner was born in 1831. She was the daughter of Henry Augustus Skinner and Mary Creecy.

Elizabeth Rice Skinner

b. 1834
     From THE SKINNER KINSMEN, Volume I, The Descendants of Richard Skinner of North Carolina, Compiled by Doris Seymour Wahl and Cynthia Walker Rummel. Elizabeth Rice Skinner was born in 1834 at NC. She was the daughter of Henry Augustus Skinner and Mary Creecy.

Joseph Harvey Skinner

b. 2 June 1835, d. 20 June 1862
     Joseph Harvey Skinner was born on 2 June 1835 at NC. He was the son of Henry Augustus Skinner and Mary Creecy. Joseph Harvey Skinner died on 20 June 1862 at age 27.

from THE SKINNER KINSMEN, Volume I, The Descendants of Richard Skinner of North Carolina, compiled by Doris Seymour Wahl and Cynthia Walker Rummel. The archives of Spring Hill College, Mobile, indicate that he entered there on January 24, 1851, his parents were Henry Skinner and Mary Crecy from "Wilderness Post Office" Clarke County, Alabama, he was born in North Carolina. "He had the measles in the Spring and being taken home before he had entirely recovered. Became very sick by reason of eating -----. He spent a good while at home and became very home sick. Another reason which promted his father to withdraw him is supposed to have been the desire he manafested to enter the Catholic Church. "In 185? during the prevalence of the yellow feaver at Mobile the father was taken ill, sent for Bp Porter and was taken into the church. Previously the mother was admitted during a spell of sickness. Two daughters also are Catholics & brother George: Joseph is not yet a Catholic but is thinking of it. April 24th 1854." There is a headstone in the Old Catholic Cemetery in Mobile in Section XV that reads: "To our brother Joseph H. Skinner a member of the Mobile Rifles 3rd Ala. Reg. died June 20th, 1862 from wounds received at the battle of Seven Pines, VA. aged 27 years."

Joshua Skinner1,2

b. 24 July 1724, d. 30 November 1777
     Joshua was reared a Quaker - Sarah a Methodist; sometime after their marriage they "compromised" by becoming Baptists.

Will: Joshua Skinner, Jan 28, 1774; Jan. Cort 1777, Perqs., Co., NC. Wife Sarah (6 spoons marked "P"), sons of Joshua and John, dtr. Mary Skinner, Sam'l Nichols (son of Geo.), cousin gJoshua Skinner, bor. Wm skinner; Wm White, Benj. Harvey, son Joshua Executors. John Miles & Thos. Harvey Trustees. Test, Miles Harvey, Benj. Harvey, Joshua Wyatt, Eleazer Creecy. (NC Reg. v3, p189)

From American Quaker Genealogy 1778, July 1, Joshua and John - disowned. Joshua Skinner was born on 24 July 1724 at Berkeley Prec., NC. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy. Joshua Skinner married Sarah Wingate Creecy, daughter of Levi Creecy and Patience (?), on 22 January 1745 at Berkeley, NC. Joshua Skinner died on 30 November 1777 at Perquimans Co., NC, at age 53. He was buried at Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Perquimans Co., NC.

Children of Joshua Skinner and Sarah Wingate Creecy

Citations

  1. [S27] William Wade Hinshaw Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume I, Page 17.
  2. [S69] Doris Seymour Wahl and Cynthia Walker Rummel, The Skinner Kinsmen, The Descendants of Richard Skinner of North Carolina, Page 17.

Sarah Wingate Creecy

b. June 1723, d. 1 December 1786
     Sarah Wingate Creecy was buried at Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Perquimans Co., NC. She was born in June 1723. She was the daughter of Levi Creecy and Patience (?) Sarah Wingate Creecy married Joshua Skinner, son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy, on 22 January 1745 at Berkeley, NC. Sarah Wingate Creecy died on 1 December 1786 at Perquimans Co., NC, at age 63.

Children of Sarah Wingate Creecy and Joshua Skinner

Joseph Skinner

b. 4 February 1747, d. 13 December 1769
     Joseph Skinner was buried at Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Perquimans Co., NC. He was born on 4 February 1747. He was the son of Joshua Skinner and Sarah Wingate Creecy. Joseph Skinner died on 13 December 1769 at age 22.

Sarah Skinner

b. 17 April 1751, d. 20 November 1751
     Sarah Skinner was born on 17 April 1751. She was the daughter of Joshua Skinner and Sarah Wingate Creecy. Sarah Skinner died on 20 November 1751.

Col. Joshua Skinner1

b. 31 October 1752, d. 21 September 1839
     Col. Joshua Skinner was buried at Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Perquimans Co., NC. He was born on 31 October 1752 at Perquimans Co., NC. He was the son of Joshua Skinner and Sarah Wingate Creecy. Col. Joshua Skinner married Martha Ann Blount, daughter of Charles Worth Blount and Mary Clayton, on 7 March 1780. Col. Joshua Skinner died on 21 September 1839 at age 86.

Citations

  1. [S69] Doris Seymour Wahl and Cynthia Walker Rummel, The Skinner Kinsmen, The Descendants of Richard Skinner of North Carolina, Page 28.

Elizabeth Skinner

b. 5 July 1755, d. 29 October 1756
     Elizabeth Skinner was born on 5 July 1755. She was the daughter of Joshua Skinner and Sarah Wingate Creecy. Elizabeth Skinner died on 29 October 1756 at age 1.

Mary Skinner

b. 19 February 1757
     Mary Skinner was born on 19 February 1757 at Perquimans Co., NC. She was the daughter of Joshua Skinner and Sarah Wingate Creecy.

Richard Skinner1

b. 15 February 1690, d. 1752
     Richard Skinner was christened on 15 February 1690 at St Peter's, New Kent Co., VA. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Mary (?) Richard Skinner married Sarah Creecy in 1714 at Perquimans Prec. Richard Skinner left a will on 18 May 1752. He died in 1752 at Perquimans Prec., NC.

from THE SKINNER KINSMEN, Volume I, The Descendants of Richard Skinner of North Carolina; Compiled by Doris Seymour Wahl and Cynthia Walker Rummel. Additional information from Ms. Elizabeth V. Moore. Died by July 1752 (probate).





WILL OF RICHARD SKINNER

In the name of God Amen, this 18th day of May, in the year of our Lord 1752. I, Richard Skinner of the county of Perquimans and Province of North Carolina, being Sick in boddy but of perfect mind and memory thanks be to Almighty God. Therefore, Calling unto mind the Mortality of my boddy and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die doe make and ordain this my last will and Testament. That is to any priricipally and first of all, I give and Recommend my Soul into the hands of God that gave it and my boddy I Recommend to the Earth to be buried in a Decent and Christian manner at the Discretion of my Executors hereafter named. Nothing doubting but at the Generall Resurrection I shall Receive the same again by the power of Almighty God my Redeemer. And as touching such Worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life I give, Devise and Dispose of the Same in the following manner and form:
In Primis I will and desire that as Soon as my Death all my Just Debts, that in Right or Conceine I owe to every person or persons, be dischargd and payd with Justice. Item, I give and Bequeath to my dearly belov'd wife SARAH SKINNER, the plantation whereon I now live, with the liberty of Timber, for the plantation's use but none to be Sold nor carried Away During her widowhood, as farr back as the main Road. And in case she Marrys my will is that she have the one half of said plantation, with the dwelling house, milk house, Smoke house and Kitchen During her Natural life. Item, I give and Bequeath to my belov'd Son, SAML. SKINNER, the plantation whereon he now lives with the lands belonging thereto, to be Enjoyed by him and his heirs for Ever. Item, I give and bequeath to my belov'd Son, EAVENS SKINNER, the plant'n whereon John Simpson flow lives, Lying in Chowan County, with Two Hundred ninety acres of land, to be Enjoyed by him and his heirs for Ever.
Item, I give and Bequeath to my Belov'd Son, JOSHUA SKINNER, my plantation Lying on the Sound Side, formerly call'd Fendell's Containing One Hundred and fifty Acres of Land, whereon he now lives, Beginning at the Sound Side and Running to the back head line, being the one half of the land I purchased of Christian Reed to be Enjoyed by him and the heirs of his Boddy Lawfully Begotten and in Default of such heirs to my belov"d Son, JOHN SKINNER, and the heirs of his boddy Lawfully Begotten. Items: I give and Bequeath to my Belov'd Son WILLIAM SKINNER my back plantation adjoining the plantation whereon I now live, from the back head line unto the Main Road and in case my wife Marry, I give the other half of the plantation whereon I now live unto my Said Son, WILLIAM and after her Death I give the Said Plantation with the houses and lands belonging thereto unto my said Son, WM SKINNER, to be Enjoyed by him and the heirs of his boddy lawfully begotten and in Default of Such heirs unto my belov'd Son SAMUEL SKINNER and the heirs of his boddy lawfully Begotten, and in default of such heirs unto my belov'd Son, JOSHUA SKINNER and the heirs of his Boddy Lawfully begotten and in default of Such heir to my Son, JOHN SKINNER, and the heirs of his body lawfully Begotten.
Item, I give and Bequeath unto my son, JOHN SKINNER, my plantation Lying on the Sound Side, formerly called Petifer's with one hundred and fifty Acres of Land, being the other half of the land I purchased of Chris'n Reed, to be enjoyed by him and the heirs of his boddy lawfullybegotten and in Default of Such heir unto my belov'd Son, JOSHUA SKINNER and the heirs of his boddy Lawfully begotten. Item, I give and bequeath unto my Dearly Belov'd wife, SARAH SKINNER, the sole use of the plantation whereon Thomas Munds now lives, lying in Chowan County, during her widowhood and at or after her Marriage or Death, I Give and Bequeath unto my belov'd Son, SAMUEL SKINNER the said plantation with one hundred and fifty Acres of land to be enjoyed by him and his heirs for Ever. Item, I give and Bequeath unto my belov'd Son SAM'L SKINNER my Negro Girl named Serenah to be enjoyed by him and his heirs for Ever. Item, I give and Bequeath unto my Belov'd Son, JOSHUA SKINNER, my negro girl Venus, to be enjoyed by him and his heirs for Ever. Item, I give and Bequeath unto my belov'd son WILL'M SKINNER my negro Girl nam'd Hannah, one feather Bed and furniture, four Cows and Calves, Six head of Sheep, two Iron Potts and one Ovell Table to the Value of twelve Shillings and Six pence Virga. Money. Item, I give and Bequeath unto my belov'd Son, JOHN SKINNER, my negro boy nam'd Frank, one feather bed and furniture, four Cows and Calves, Six head of Sheep, two Iron potts and one Ovell Table to the value of twelve Shills. and Six pence Virga. money. Item, my will and desire is that my two Negroes, Namely Sell and Zangoe be continued in the possession of and for the use of my wife untill her Marriage or death and then my will is that the above named two Negroes and their Increase, if any, be equally Devided between my five Sons, Namely, SAMUEL, EAVENS, JOSHUA, WILLIAM and JOHN to be enjoyed by them and their heirs for Ever. Item, I give unto my belov'd wife, SARAH SKINNER, the use of my Negro woman nam'd Flora and her Increase, if any During her Naturall life and at her Decease my will and Desire Is that the said Negro woman Nam'd Flora and her Increase If any be Equally Devided between my five sons, Namely SAMUEL, EAVENS, JOSHUA, WILUAM and JOHN, to be enjoy'd by them and their heirs for Ever. Item, I give unto my Dearly belov'd wife SARAH SKINNER the use of all the rest and Residue of my Personall Estate During her widdowhood and after her Marriage, to have one third of my personal Estate to her own use and Benefit; the other two thirds of said Estate after my wife's part Is taken out to be Equally Devided between my five Sons, Namely: SAMUEL, EAVENS, JOSHUA, WILLIAM and JOHN, to be enjoy'd by them and their heirs for Ever. It is my will and Desire that in case Either one or more of the Young Negroes bequeathed my Sons Should Die before the Davision of my Estate or they are possessed with them; It is my Desire that the Value of Such Negroes or negro, as may happen to die as affered Shall be made Good unto him or them out of my Estate. My will and Desire is that in case there should hereafter arise any Disputes or Differences between my wife and Children or any of them, that Joseph White, John Harvey and Benjamin Harvey, or any two of them, doe Decide or determine the Same and they the said Joseph White, John Harvey & Benjamin Harvey or any two of them, is hereby Appointed whole and Sole Arbitrators of any Disputes or differences that may arise between my wife and children or any of them by virtue of my will. And lastly, of this my last will and Testament I doe Nominate, Constitute, ordain and Appoint my Dearly belov'd Wife, SARAH SKINNER Executrix; My Belov'd Son SMUEL SKINNER, my Belov'd Son, JOSHUA SKINNER my Belov'd Son WILLIAM SKINNER and my Belov'd Son, JOHN SKINNER Executors to this my last Will and Testament to see it Strictly fulfill'd in all its parts Revoking and Disallowing all other will or wills by me made Ratifyin g and Confirming this to be my last will and Testament in witness whereoff I have hereunto sett my hand and Seal the day and Year above written.

His

RICHARD x SKINNER (SEAL)
Mark

Sign'd Seal'd Publish'd, Pronounc'd and Declared by the Said Rich'd Skinner to be his last will and Testament in Presence off us who are likewise Witnesses to the underwritten Memdm. at same time.

JOSEPH WHITE Affd.
PETER JONES, Affd.
JOHN HARVEY.

Memorandum: that it is my will and desire that my Grand Daughter have and doe hereby Give and bequeath unto my Said Grand Daughter, SARAH SKINNER, one Cow and Calf. As witness my hand the date Above Mentioned.

His

RICHARD x SKINNER (SEAL)
Mark
SARAH     )     Qualified Affm.
JOSHUA     )     and William Affm. qualified by Oath.

PERQUIMANS COUNTY - July Court, Anno Dom. 1752.

Present His Majesty's Justices. These may certifie that the will hereunto annexed and the memorandum was duly Proved in Open Court by the affirmations of Joseph White and Peter Jones, two of the Subscribing Evidences thereto and the same time appear'd Sarah Skinner Exr. and Joshua Skinner, Exr. who was duly qualified thereto by taking the affirmation by law appointed and William Skinner another Exr. was duly qualified thereto by taking the oath by law appointed. Ordered that the Secretary of his Deputy of Said Province have notice that Letters Testamentary issue thereon as the law directs. Test. Edmund Hatch, Clerk of the Court.

(Copied from Original Will filed in the Office of the Secretary of State, Raleigh, N. C. - From North Carolina Colonial Records).

Children of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy

Citations

  1. [S27] William Wade Hinshaw Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Volume I, Page 17.

Sarah Creecy

     Richard Skinner's will, probated in July 1752, written 18 May 1752, mentioned that she was still alive. Sarah Creecy married Richard Skinner, son of Richard Skinner and Mary (?), in 1714 at Perquimans Prec.

Children of Sarah Creecy and Richard Skinner

James Skinner1

b. 5 October 1715, d. 12 June 1743
     Preceded his father in death so not mentioned in Richard's will. James Skinner was born on 5 October 1715. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy. James Skinner married Mary Pierce, daughter of John Pierce, on 4 June 1736. James Skinner died on 12 June 1743 at age 27.

Citations

  1. [S27] William Wade Hinshaw Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Page 17 (Volume 1 with Supplement).

Richard Skinner1

b. 15 November 1717
     Quaker Encyclopedia lists Samuel and Richard with same birthdate, twins? However, he was not mentioned in his father's will, was he already deceased? Richard Skinner was born on 15 November 1717. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy.

Citations

  1. [S27] William Wade Hinshaw Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy.

Joseph Skinner

b. 11 August 1722, d. 15 September 1739
     Joseph Skinner was born on 11 August 1722. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy. Joseph Skinner died on 15 September 1739 at age 17.

Jonathan Skinner

b. 13 July 1726
     Jonathan Skinner was born on 13 July 1726. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy.

William Skinner Gen.

b. 25 December 1728
     William Skinner Gen. was born on 25 December 1728. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy.

John Skinner

b. 21 November 1730
     John Skinner was born on 21 November 1730. He was the son of Richard Skinner and Sarah Creecy.

Ambrose Powell Captain

b. 18 September 1715, d. 18 September 1788
     From information from Reed Browning in the "Browning Genealogy" Powell was one of the first surveyors of the State of Kentucky, and an intimate freind of James Madison, Sr., the father of the fourth president of the United States. He was the godfather of Nellie Madison, a daughter of James Madison Sr. Ambrose Powell Captain was born on 18 September 1715. He died on 18 September 1788 at age 73.

Child of Ambrose Powell Captain and Mary Bledsoe

Anne Powell

b. 3 February 1755, d. 25 July 1805
     Anne Powell was born on 3 February 1755. She was the daughter of Ambrose Powell Captain and Mary Bledsoe. Anne Powell married Colonel Henry Hill, son of Russell Hill and Anne Towles, on 2 February 1771. Anne Powell died on 25 July 1805 at age 50.

Children of Anne Powell and Colonel Henry Hill

Colonel Henry Hill

b. 7 October 1743, d. 12 September 1815
     Information provided by Reed Browning; Box 382; Gambier, OH 43022 in Letter dated May 19, 1995 ATthe close of the Revolutionary War, he held he rank of Captain i the Virginia forces. From "General A.P. Hill: The Story of a Confederate Warrior" by James I. Robertson, Jr; 1987 Random House; p4 "Russell's son Henry (1743-1815) married Anne Powell, daughter of the prominent Virginian. Henry Hill served in the Revolutionary War under Col. 'Light Horse Harry' Lee and then built Millwood, an estate of several thousand acres in nearby Madison County, Va. Henry Hill has been described as `a very large man,' a description that certainly fits the wealth and influence he ultimately possessed. "Five children came from the marriage of Henry Hill and Anne Powell." Colonel Henry Hill was born on 7 October 1743. He was the son of Russell Hill and Anne Towles. Colonel Henry Hill married Anne Powell, daughter of Ambrose Powell Captain and Mary Bledsoe, on 2 February 1771. Colonel Henry Hill died on 12 September 1815 at age 71.

Children of Colonel Henry Hill and Anne Powell

Kitty Grosh Morgan

b. 25 July 1834, d. 20 March 1920
     Kitty Grosh Morgan also went by the name of Dolly Morgan. She was born on 25 July 1834. She married General Ambrose Powell Hill, son of Major Thomas Hill and Fannie Russell Baptist, on 18 July 1859. Kitty Grosh Morgan died on 20 March 1920 at Lexington, KY, at age 85. She was buried on 25 March 1925 at Lexington, KY.

Children of Kitty Grosh Morgan and General Ambrose Powell Hill

Russell Hill

b. 22 February 1716
     Russell Hill was born on 22 February 1716. He was the son of William Russell Hill and Frances Needless.

Child of Russell Hill and Anne Towles